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ANNUAL REPORT 




TOWN of HATFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

1997 



ANNUAL REPORT 




TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1997 



TOWN REPORT PREPARATION -- TERESA HUDOCK 



Printed by Athol Press, Inc., Athol, MA. 01331 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

INCORPORATED 1670 

AREA ELEVATION POPULATION 

9,300 Acres 1 32 Feet at Main St. 3443 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin-Hampshire District 

Stanley Rosenberg 

State House Room 413, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1532 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

First Hampshire District 

William P. Nagle, Jr. 

State House, Room 343 

Boston, MA 02133 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

First Congressional District 

John W. Olver 

1027 Longworth House Office Building 

Washington, D.C. 20515 

Local Office 

490 Westfield Road 

Holyoke Mass. 01040 

(413)532-7010 

SENATORS IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 

315 Russell Senate Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

John F. Kerry 

421 Russell Senate Office Building 

Washintgton, D.C. 20510 



The Athenian Oath 

We will never bring disgrace to this our town, by any act of 
dishonesty or cowardice, nor ever desert our sufferin 
comrades in the ranks; we will fight for the ideals and 
sacred things of the town, both alone and with many; we 
will revere and obey the town's laws and do our best to 
incite a like respect in those above us who are prone to annul 
or set them at naught; we will strive unceasingly to 
quicken the public's sense of civic duty, thus in all these 
ways we will transmit this town not only less, but greater 
and more beautiful than it was transmitted to us. 



This Annual Report 

Is Dedicated 
To the Memory of 



Peter S. Rogaleski 

Town Clerk - Treasurer 
February 15, 1942 - October 1, 1976 




Beverly Page 

Town Secretary 
July 1, 1980 - July 10. 1997 




Lucille Godek 

School Nurse 
September 1952 to September 1, 1992 




In appreciation for their years of service to the Town of Hatfield 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1997 

(Numbers in parentheses indicate year term expires) 



ELECTED 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward Jr. (1999) 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

George G. Zgrodnik Jr. (1998) 
J. Michael Cahill ( 1999) 
E. Lary Grossman (2000) 

TOWN CLERK/TREASURER 

G. Louise Slysz ( 1999) 

TOWN COLLECTOR 

Joanne Porada (1999) 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Christopher G. Smith (1999) 
Alexander W. Ciszewski (1998) 
Ronald Punska (2000) 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patrick J. Gaughan ( 1998) 
Stanley J. Pitchko, Jr. (1999) 
Mark Vachula (1999) 
Janet R. Szych (2000) 
Janice M. Davis (2000) 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Thomas G. Berniche (1999) 
Christopher F. Miller (2000) 
Sandra D. Shields (1998) 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Kathleen F. Winters (1998) 
Thomas Carroll (1999) 
Jane A. Scavotto (2000) 

ELECTOR, OLIVER SMITH WILL 

Henry P. Betsold ( 1998) 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

A. Cory Bardwell (1998) 
Edward S. Kowalski (2000) 
William Podmayer (1999) 

TREE WARDEN 

Norman C. Campbell (1999) 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Frederick J. Dzialo (1999) 
Anthony J. Gillespie (2000) 
William P. Korza ( 1998) 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

William E. Pashek ( 1999) 
Stanley J. Sliwoski (2000) 
A. Cory Bardwell (1998) 

PLANNING BOARD 

A. Cory Bardwell (2001) 
Edward D. Molloy ( 1998) 
E. Lary Grossman (1999) 
Robert T. Bartlett (2000) 
Daniel Barry (2002) 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Alice Maiewski (2002) 

Michael J. McGrath (2000) 

Joseph A. Szych (1998) 

Raymond W. Thomas (2001) 

Arthur Malone (2001), state appt. member 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Sean M.Barry (1999) 

APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

(3-Year Term) 
Leslie H. Button (1998) 
Patrick Gaughan (1999) 
E. Lary Grossman (2000) 

CULTURAL COUNCIL 

(3-Year Term) 
Melissa Green (1999) 
Connie Pogue (2000) 
BrendaBolduc(1999) 
Alan Bloomgarden (2000) 
Edward Moret (2000) 
Marsha Molloy (1999) 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

(3-Year Term) 
Mildred Z. Osley(1999) 
Helen H. Bardwell (2000) 
Ruth Kuchyt (1998) 
G. Louise Slysz, Clerk 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING COMMITTEE 

(Annually) 
Joseph Lavallee 
Mark Vachula 
Robert Bartlett 
J. Michael Cahill 
Steven Bernson 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 

(Annually) 

Robert J. Osepowicz 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

(3-Year Term) 
Gordon O. Williams (2000) 
A.CoryBardwell(1998) 
Virginia Y. Orson (1998) 
ThaddeusL. Kabat(1999) 
Paul Davis (2000) 
Stanley Sliwoski (1999) 
Christopher Brennan (2000) 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

(3-Year Term) 
William Podmayer (1998) 
Henry P. Betsold ( 1999) 
Worth Noyes (2000) 
Mary Brennan (1999) 
Laura Schilling (2000) 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

(Annually) 
Robert Tefft 

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS COMMITTEE 

(Annually) 
Richard Drury 
Theodore E. Celatka, Jr. 
William Belden 
Thomas O. Hart 
Thomas J. Hurley 
Robert J. Osepowicz 
David Hurley 
Jan Adamski 
Greg Gagnon 
William Metzger 
Mary Jane Bacon 
Stanley Sliwoski 
Richard McBroom 

FIELD DRIVER & FENCE VIEWER 

(Annually) 
Robert Tefft 



HIGHWAY SUPERINTENDENT 

(Annually) 
Christopher Miller 

HILLTOWN RESOURCE 
MANAGEMENT COOPERATIVE 

A. Cory Bardwell (1998) 
William E. Pashek ( 1998) 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

(3-Year Term) 
Mary Lou Cutter (2000) 
George H.Ashley III (1998) 
Thomas Prew (1999) 
Thomas Carroll (2000) 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

(5-Year Term) 
Albert M. Omasta ( 1998) 
Daniel Barry (1999) 
Robert Gates (1997) 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCING AUTHORITY 

(5-Year Term) 
James Lavallee (1998) 
G. Louise Slysz ( 1999) 
Ronald Smiarowski (2000) 
David I. Dulong (2001) 
Edward J. Kuchyt ( 1997) 

INSPECTION SERVICES 

(Annually) 
Inspector of Buildings 

Stanley Sadowski 
Asst. Inspector of Buildings 

Stanley Szewczyk 
Asst. Electrical Inspector 
(2- Year Term) 

Stanley Symanski (1998) 
Electrical Inspector 

David Lizek (1998) 
Gas Inspector 
(Yearly) 

Walter Geryk (1997) 
Plumbing Inspector 

Walter Geryk (1997) 
Asst. Plumbing Inspector 

Rene Labbe (1997) 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND SLAUGHTER 

(Annually) 
William J. Shea 



JOINT TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FOR 
PIONEER VALLEY REGION 

(Annually) 

Mary Couture-Burgess 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

(Yearly) 
Eugene Proulx 
Frederick Dzialo 
Robert T. Bartlett 

PUBLIC SAFETY COMPLEX COMMITTEE 

Robert Osepowicz 
Jonathan Bardwell 
Ted Celatka 
David Hurley 
Eugene Proulx 
Norman Campbell 

MILL RIVER WATERSHED ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

(Annually) 
Paul Davis 
A. Cory Bardwell 
Frank Motyka 
Christopher Miller 
Peter Labarber 



WESTERN VALLEY WATER PROTECTION 
COMMITTEE 

(Yearly) 

Paul Davis 

A. Cory Bardwell 

Christopher Miller 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

(5-Year Term) 

Thaddeus L. Kabat (2000) 

Giles F.Desmond (1998) 

Bryan Nicholas (1999) 

Alt. Kenneth R. Balise (2001) 

Alt. Lawrence Stoddard (2002) 

APPOINTED BY MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

(3-Year Term) 
Steven Bemson (1998) 
C. Gregory Winters (2000) 
Paul Labbee (1999) 
Paul Dostal (1999) 
Gary Richardson (2000) 

EMERGENCY SERVICES PERSONNEL 



PUBLIC WEIGHERS 

(Yearly) 
Todd McCoy 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

(3-Year Term) 
Bruce G.Brown (1999) 
Mark Wickles (2000) 
Richard Strong (1998) 
Bernard Motyka (1998) 
Dana Weybrew (1999) 

VETERANS' COMMEMORATIVE COMMITTEE 

(Yearly) 

Henry P. Betsold 
Kenneth E. Balise 
Edmund E. Jaworski, Jr. 
Robert Cutter 
Bryan O. Nicholas 

VETERANS' AGENT 

(Yearly) 

Richard Burrington 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 

Theodore Celatka, Jr., Manager 

Gregory Gagnon, Asst. Manager 

James Crepeau 

James Gagnon 

Barrett Rogaleski 

Worth Noyes 

Jeffery Suriano 

Cessie Pelis 

Gregory E. Weeks 

Darryl L. Williams 

Susan Breen-Pomeroy 

Laurie Banas 

Douglass Baker 

Mark Ober 

Steve Gaughan 

FIRE DEPARTMENT OFFICERS 

Chief Robert Osepowicz 
William A. Belden, Deputy Chief 
John T. Pease, Deputy Chief 
Capt. Ronald R. Lavallee 
Capt. Jonathan Bardwell 
Lt. Matthew S. Reopel 
Lt. Edwin McGlew III 



FIRE FIGHTERS 

Jan J. Adamski 
Nikolas Adamski 
Garrett Barry 
Paul Bielunis 
Theodore Celatka, Jr. 
Gresgon Chase 
James Crepeau 
Gregory Dibrindisi 
Gregory Gagnon 
Timothy M. Houle 
Worth H. Noyes 
R. Scott Pomeroy 
James Purcell 
Barrett Rogaleski 
Thomas Sadowski 
Richard Shea 
Robert Shea 
Malcomb Broussard 
Stanley Lapa 
Tracey T Rogers 
Timothy Jackewich 
Stephen Gaughan 
Kurt Yanginski 
Paul Worsnop 



POLICE OFFICERS 

Michael Holhut (1999) 
William F.Boyle (1999) 
Daniel Warner 
Matthew Barstow (1999) 
John Vey (1999) 
William Scott 
Michael Stiles 
Raymond Redfern 
Jessica D. Kiendzior 

FIRE DEPARTMENT VEHICLE 
ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE 

James Szynal, Jr. 
Norman Campbell 
Robert Donaldson 
William Belden 
Robert Osepowicz 
Robert Tefft 

HAMPSHIRE LOCAL EMERGENCY 
PLANNING COMM. 

David M. Hurley (2000) 
Robert Osepowicz (1999) 
Theodore Celatka, Alternate (1999) 



POLICE STAFF 

Chief David M. Hurley (1999) 
Sgt. Gregory E. Weeks (1999) 
Sgt. Thomas J. Osley (1999) 



8 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The last year has seen many changes in the Board of Se- 
lectmen, both in membership and philosophy. We say good-bye 
to long time Selectman Thomas J. Hurley. We will miss his ex- 
pertise and knowledge of the Town and thank him for his contri- 
butions, both as a Selectman and an active member of the com- 
munity. We welcome E. Lary Grossman as the newest member 
of the Board. 

Community Input, Accessibility and Outreach 

The Board of Selectmen has made a determined effort to 
expand community outreach and allow for easier public acces- 
sibility to the board and its deliberations. Initial steps include 
dedicating the first fifteen minutes of Selectmen's meetings to a 
community forum which gives the public an opportunity to ad- 
dress issues and introduce ideas to the Selectmen. Meetings have 
been moved from the Town Clerk - Treasurer's Office to the 
Memorial Town Hall Community Room. This relocation pro- 
vides additional space and more comfortable seating for the pub- 
lic. Beyond the Town Hall postings and meeting notices in the 
local press, the Selectmen promote the meetings on a large sign 
on the town hall front lawn. Local businessman John Siegel of 
Linseed Road was commissioned to make the sign. We thank 
him for his ongoing contribution in providing us updated date 
and time postings. 

While we are trying to encourage all interested residents 
to attend and participate in Selectmen's meetings, we are also 
showing a willingness to come to them. This past year saw the 
beginning of Selectmen's meetings held in several areas of the 
Town. The first outdoor meeting ever was held at the Main Street 
Common, followed by Sister's Convenience Store in West 
Hatfield and the North Hatfield Common. As the seasons allow, 
continued neighborhood outreach is planned to include further 
outside meetings as well as meeting locations in other town build- 
ings (eg, the Board held a meeting in Smith Academy's library 
in the fall of 1997). Also, the Selectmen, for the first time in 
recent memory, chose to sit with the people at a special town 
meeting in December. 

Communication Technology 

Full implementation of the Centrex telephone system was 
completed. This conversion offers cost efficiency as well as fea- 
tures that expedite communications between departments and 
with the public. The public now has access to individual depart- 
ments through direct phone lines. In the absence of personnel in 
those departments, calls can be forwarded to the secretarial pool. 
During non-business hours callers to the Town Hall's main num- 
bers are greeted with voice mail. This affords the opportunity 
for the public to leave messages and arrange for responses. This 
voice mail will also be used to provide the public up to date 
information in the case of power and cables outages and other 
emergencies. 



The Town Hall also took its first small step onto the "in- 
formation highway". Internet access is available to town depart- 
ments through the computer in the secretaries' office. Depart- 
ments are able to get up to date information from state offices 
and other sources relevant to their operation. 

E-mail affords another way of communicating among state, 
local, and the general public. The public is encouraged to e-mail 
us at hatfield@javanet.com. We welcome your input. 

Accomplishments 

In March 1997 the Board of Selectmen signed a five year 
renewal for cable license with Continental Cablevision, now 
MediaOne. Federal law prohibits negotiation of rates and chan- 
nels in the license renewal process. Hatfield's new license in- 
cludes a community channel for use by residents of the Town, 
the schools, and local government. Training and equipment will 
be provided by MediaOne. Preliminary discussion have begun 
with MediaOne, the school department, and the Selectmen in 
implementing local cable access. The Selectmen acknowledge 
and thank the members of the Cable Advisory Committee for 
their time and research in recommending a contract that best 
serves the residents of the community. Those members are Chair- 
man E. Lary Grossman, Patrick Gaughan, and Leslie Button. 

The Board of Selectmen has instituted changes relevant to 
the operation of departments under its jurisdiction. The Select- 
men are aggressively promoting an expectation of professional- 
ism, accountability, and civility from their department heads in 
dealings with the public and other town employees. Towards 
that end the Selectmen have introduced a policy of annual evalu- 
ations for department heads. Department heads are also required 
to institute an evaluation process for their staff. Above and be- 
yond the evaluations, the Selectmen's goal is to meet with all 
department heads quarterly in order to exchange concerns and 
ideas and report on operations within that department. 

To further promote accountability and efficiency, the prac- 
tice of individual Selectmen serving as liaisons to various boards 
and departments has been discontinued. Administrative Assis- 
tance Mary Burgess works directly and closely with the Board 
of Selectmen and can better respond to the needs of departments. 
Departmental operations, planning, and coordination are more 
effectively communicated to and from the Selectmen as a board 
through the Administrative Assistant. A separate annual report 
for the Administrative Assistant is being eliminated as the per- 
formance of the Administrative Assistant's position is directly 
related to the directives and policies of the Board of Selectmen. 

This past year saw the retirement of Town Accountant, 
Robert Miller. We wish him health and happiness. Dale Kowacki 
was appointed the new Town Accountant. An independent con- 



tractor, he brings to the position the knowledge and experience 
of serving other small communities as their Town Accountant. A 
major conversion and full computerization of the accounting 
function has led to temporary reporting delays and the inconve- 
nience of some departments. The completion of the conversion, 
as well as staff training in the clerical pool, will result in much 
improved information and accounting services to departments 
and the public from the accountant's office. 

The clerical pool was repurposed under the Administra- 
tive Assistant to better support part-time boards and departments 
as well as the Board of Selectmen. The acquisition of a com- 
puter to support the functions of the Building Inspector and the 
Board of Health will allow for clerical pool staff to respond to 
issues in those departments in the absence of their personnel. 
The Board of Health's Septic Loan Management Program, ap- 
proved at a Fall 1997 Special Town Meeting, will be supported 
by clerical staff trained to respond to both the public and the 
state in that program's operation. 

In response to increasing costs for the repair and purchase 
of vehicles and equipment, the Board of Selectmen established 
a new department and introduced the new position of Vehicle 
Maintenance Manager. This position is responsible for recom- 
mending to the Board of Selectmen the budgeting, maintenance, 
and acquisition of new and used equipment and vehicles for all 
departments. James Szynal brings to this position extensive ex- 
perience in fleet management in the private sector. 

Future Plans 

A Department of Public Works 

The Board of Selectmen's outreach has brought to our at- 
tention residents' concerns about townwide public works opera- 
tions. Issues about highway operations, additional costs and ex- 
pertise needed to operate the town's water distribution system, 
the need to plan and fund the expansion of the town's sewer 
system, and the desire to more effectively utilize personnel and 
equipment have prompted the Board of Selectmen to propose 
the creation of a Department of Public Works. This department 
will be led by a professional director responsible for the opera- 
tion, coordination, and planning of public works in the Town of 
Hatfield. This new organization would involve the consolida- 
tion of the highway, water, sewer, tree warden and recycling 
center operations. In the fall a DPW report was commissioned 
from a consultant. This report was built on a 1987 report recom- 
mending a Department of Public Works for the Town of Hatfield. 
In a February 1998 kickoff meeting with department heads, com- 
missioners and employees, the group listed over 30 benefits that 
ultimately would result in improved services and better use of 
tax money for the community. 



The Selectmen are aggressively pursuing input from both 
the town's departments and the public in preparing a final pro- 
posal to be acted upon by the voters at the May 1998 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Road and Sidewalk Improvements 

The multi-million dollar expansion of drainage and sewer 
to the Bridge Street and Gore Avenue neighborhoods will begin 
in the next few months. The Town secured approval to partici- 
pate in the State Revolving Fund Program. This program will 
allow the Town to borrow the cost of the sewer project at zero 
percent interest. Aggressive attempts are being made to secure 
full funding for the road reconstruction portion of that project. 
Talks are ongoing with our local legislative representatives as 
well as Mass Highway in order to secure financial assistance. 

The Board of Selectmen is committed to an ongoing multi- 
year road and sidewalk improvement program. Chapter 90 funds 
will be committed to reconstruction of deteriorating high traffic 
roadways and sidewalks throughout the Town beginning this 
summer. 

Facilities Space Plan 

In November the Property Committee requested that the 
Board of Selectmen develop a long range facilities space plan. 
The need for the plan was underscored by the needs of the His- 
torical Commission and Historical Society. In December both 
organizations informed of the Selectmen of the dire conditions 
under which irreplaceable historical records were being stored. 
Environmental conditions at Dickinson Memorial Library as well 
as in Memorial Town Hall are contributing to the deterioration 
of these documents. 

In response to these concerns, as well as the ever increas- 
ing pressure on local governments to expand, the Selectmen are 
supporting the Property Committee's request to develop a fa- 
cilities space plan. Professional assistance is being sought, hope- 
fully from a college or university intern program. Subsequent 
input from town departments and the public will be crucial to 
the relevance and success of the plan. 

The Board of Selectmen wants to thank the community 
for the privilege of being able to serve and contribute to the fu- 
ture success of our town. 

J. Michael Cahill, Chairman 
George Zgrodnik, Member 
E. Lary Grossman, Member 



10 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

GENERAL FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 

June 30, 1997 

ASSETS 



CASH AND INVESTMENTS 

Accounts Receivable: 

Real Estate Taxes 1997 

Levy 1996 
Levy 1995 

Rollback Taxes 61 A 

Personal Property Taxes 

Levy 1997 
Levy 1996 
Levy 1995 
Levy 1994 & Prior 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 

Levy 1997 
Levy 1996 
Levy 1995 
Levy 1994 
Levy 1993 
Levy 1992 & Prior 

Tax Liens 

Tax Forclosures 

Farm Animals 
Less: Allowance for Uncollectibles 
Total Assets 



1,465,069.00 



114,983.00 
64,880.00 
24,909.00 



2,453.00 
600.00 
644.00 

2,776.00 



25,400.00 
3,193.00 
2,090.00 
3,377.00 
1,139.00 
8,507.00 



LIABILITIES AND FUND EQUITY 



Liabilities 

Deferred Revenue: 
Property Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Animals 
Tax Liens/Forclosures 

Warrants Payable 

Fund Equity 

Reserved for Encumbrances 
Reserved for Subsequent Years Approp 
Unreserved, Undersignated 

Total Liability and Fund 



41,131.00 

43,706.00 

611.00 

102,536.00 



392,823.00 
300,000.00 
625,242.00 



204,772.00 
6,051.00 



6,473.00 



43,706.00 

101,397.00 

1,139.00 

611.00 

(176,165.00) 

1,653,053.00 



187,984.00 
147,004.00 



1,318,065.00 



1,653,053.00 



11 



SPECIAL REVENUE 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1997 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Receivables: 

Ambulance 

Water 1 

Sewer 

State Aid to Highway 

Total Assets 



Liabilities 

Deferred Revenue: 
Ambulance 
Water 
Sewer 
State Aid to Highway 

Warrants Payable 

Total Liabilities 

Fund Equity 

Reserved for Encumbrances 

Unreserved: 

Revolving Funds - School 

School Grants/Funds 

Emergency Planning Committee 

Library Gift/Funds 

Highway Funds 

C.O.A. Grant/Funds 

Arts Lottery 

Police Funds 

Ambulance Surplus 

Water Surplus 

Sewer Surplus 

Records/Museum Preservation 

Jaws of Life 

Recreation 

Historical - Tobacco Shed 

Conservation Funds 

Total Liabilities & Fund Equity 



1,085,373.00 



47,898.00 

4,602.00 

9,252.00 

506,114.00 



LIABILITIES AND FUND EQUITY 



47,898.00 

14,602.00 

9,252.00 

506,114.00 



353,119.00 



5,117.00 

(4,369.00) 

281.00 

13,925.00 

(41,472.00) 

2,291.00 

3,358.00 

6,219.00 

75,738.00 

441,060.00 

188,161.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

210.00 

17,500.00 

4,790.00 



577,866.00 



1,663,239.00 



577,866.00 

17,845.00 

595,711.00 



1,067,528.00 



1,663,239.00 



12 



LONG TERM DEBT 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1997 

ASSETS 



Amount to be Provided For Payment of Debt 

Bond Indebtedness: 

School Loan - Jr. Sr. High 
Sewer Loan - Facility/Orig. Loan 
Sewer Loan N. Hatfield Rd. Ext. 
Water Loans 
Assessors Maps 
Ambulance Building 
S.A. Roof 

Total Liabilities 



280,000.00 
330,000.00 
196,500.00 
24,000,000.00 
37,500.00 
113,733.00 
300,000.00 



TRUST AND AGENCY FUNDS 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1997 

ASSETS 



Cash 



LIABILITY AND FUND EQUITY 



Liability 

Employees Witholdings 

Warrants Payable 
Fund Equity 

Michael Slysz Memorial 
Graduation Awards 
Stabilization 
Unemployment 
Ambulance 
Maude Boli Trust 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Tobacco Shed 
Anniversary Trust Funds 
School - Student Activity 
Workers Comp. Insurance Trust 

Total Liability & Fund Equity 



3,657,733.00 



3*657,733.00 



655,099.00 

(5,383.00) 
62,846.00 



7,100.00 
61,378.00 
306,537.00 
20,098.00 
32,375.00 
46,745.00 
57,962.00 
10,027.00 

3,057.00 
22,825.00 
29,532.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Miller 
Town Accountant 



597,636.00 



655,099.00 



13 



ACTIVITY ON TOWN MEETING ARTICLES 







Carried 


Total 


Carried 




New In 


Forward 


Spent/Reverted 


Forward To 




FY '97 


From Prior Year 


FY '97 


FY '98 


Assessors Maps 




49,827.00 


47,702.00 


2,125.00 


Assessors New Office 




1,247.00 


1,247.00 


0.00 


Fire Station Doors 




1,997.00 




1,997.00 


Ambulance Facility 




4,055.00 


3,717.00 


338.00 


Smith Academy - Design Roof 




9,317.00 


4,900.00 


4,417.00 


Sewer Project - Bridge St. Etc. 




45,000.00 


40,500.00 


4,500.00 


Landfill Closing Preparation 




17,588.00 


14,887.00 


2,701.00 


Center School - Remove Oil Tanks 




20,000.00 




20,000.00 


Highway Dump Truck 




37,484.00 


37,484.00 


0.00 


Fire Department Pagers 




5,000.00 


4,920.00 


80.00 


Ambulance Pagers 




2,500.00 


2,460.00 


40.00 


Town Hall Record Restoration 




5,000.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


Water Filtration Facility 




2,176,089.00 


1,986,877.00 


189,212.00 


Plans Safety Facilities 




5,000.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


Town Clerks Records Restorations 




5,000.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


Fire Department Equipment 




3,390.00 


2,660.00 


730.00 


School Energy Improvement 




36,863.00 


36,863.00 


0.00 


Sewer Extension - N. Hatfield Rd. 




36,859.00 


0.00 


36,859.00 


Purchase Lots - Cemetery 




1,498.00 


0.00 


1,498.00 


Fire Dept. Protective Equipment 




1,224.00 


1,224.00 


0.00 


Running Gutter Brook - Engineering 




12,071.00 


0.00 


12,071.00 


Depot Rd. Water Project 




18,288.00 


0.00 


18,288.00 


Survey Water Services 




3,793.00 


0.00 


3,793.00 


Refund Entertainment License Fee 




200.00 


0.00 


200.00 


Tax Title Fund 




3,001.00 


0.00 


3,001.00 


Hepatisis-B Vaccine Shots 




4,240.00 


345.00 


3,895.00 


Pioneer Valley Planning Dues 


478.00 




478.00 


0.00 


Sewer Project - Bridge/Gore 


38,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


38,500.00 


Hilltown Resource Management 


11,150.00 


0.00 


11,150.00 


0.00 


County Retirement 


109,979.00 


0.00 


109,979.00 


0.00 


Prior Years Invoices 


163.00 


0.00 


163.00 


0.00 


Replace Smith Academy Roof 


300,000.00 


0.00 


297,615.00 


2,385.00 


Library Handicap Ramp 


8,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


8,000.00 


Breor School - Oil Tank Removal 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


Police Cruiser 


30,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,000.00 


Town Hall - Restoration Project 


20,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


20,000.00 


COA - Upgrade Kitchen 


14,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


14,000.00 


Water Department - New Pick Up 


35,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


35,000.00 


Technology Plan 


31,324.00 


0.00 


0.00 


31,324.00 


Consultant - Technology Plan 


2,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2,000.00 


Legal Services - Labrie 


8,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


8,000.00 


School - Litigation Special 


20,128.00 


0.00 


15,710.00 


4,418.00 


Auto Extrication Equipment 


31,644.00 


0.00 


0.00 


31,644.00 


Landfill - Engineering Cost 


35,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


35,500.00 


1998 Revaluation 


18,000.00 


0.00 


3,375.00 


14,625.00 




718,866.00 


2,506,531.00 


2,624,256.00 


601,141.00 



14 



APPROPRIATION TABLE 

July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 



Departmental 


Original 


Addition 


Total 


Total Spent 


Balance 




Appropriation 


Transfer 


Available 


Encumbered 


Reverted 


Moderator 


80 





80 


80 





Selectmen's Salaries 


7,350 





7,350 


7,337 


13 


Selectmen's Expense 


4,180 





4,180 


3,816 


364 


Admin. Asst. Wages 


31,044 





31,044 


31,044 





Admin. Asst. Expenses 


900 





900 


676 


224 


Accountant's Salary 


13,282 





13,282 


13,282 





Accountant's Expense 


2,900 





2,900 


2,642 


258 


Audit of Town Records 


5,500 





5,500 


5,500 





Treasurer's Salary 


20,085 





20,085 


20,085 





Treasurer's Expense 


11,550 





11,550 


11,539 


11 


Collector's Salary 


22,661 





22,661 


22,661 





Collector's Expense 


8,060 





8,060 


7,597 


463 


Assessors' Salaries 


12,960 





12,960 


12,436 


524 


Assessors' Expense 


19,465 


125 


19,590 


19,578 


12 


Assessors' Assistant 


25,300 





25,300 


24,103 


1,197 


Town Clerk's Salary 


11,830 





11,830 


11,830 





Town Clerks Expenses 


3,675 





3,675 


3,675 





Municipal Staff Wages 


59,093 





59,093 


47,707 


11,386 


Town Counsel 


9,372 





9,372 


9,372 





Legal/Profess. Expense 


3,000 





3,000 


2,880 


120 


Town Officials Court Action 


1,000 





1,000 





1,000 


Update Town Law Books 


1,000 





1,000 


722 


278 


Election & Registration Wages 


4,100 





4,100 


3,253 


847 


Election & Registration Expense 


1,800 





1,800 


1,696 


104 


Elector's Salary - Oliver Smith 


25 





25 


25 





Planning Board Salaries 


1,500 





1,500 


600 


900 


Planning Board Expenses 


2,760 





2,760 


1,308 


1,452 


Zoning Board of Appeals Salary 


375 





375 


150 


225 


Zoning Board of Appeals Expens 


875 





875 


275 


600 


Conservation Comm. Expense 


650 


63 


713 


713 





Finance Comm.Expense 


750 





750 


475 


275 


Historical Commission Expense 


3,600 





3,600 


3,596 


4 


Public Bldg. Maint. Wages 


8,349 





8,349 


7,162 


1,187 


Public Bldg. Maint. Expense 


21,658 


1,700 


23,358 


23,173 


185 


Police Dep. Sal & Wages 


74,668 




74,668 


74,668 





Police Dept. Expenses 


18,923 





18,923 


17,430 


1,493 


Fire Dept Sal & Wage 


20,480 


800 


21,280 


21,277 


3 


Fire Dept Expense 


28,950 





28,950 


24,222 


4,728 


Ambulance Wages 


10,625 


1,686 


12,311 


12,311 





Ambulance Expense 


10,500 





10,500 


9,147 


1,353 


Right To Know Wages 


500 





500 





500 


Tree Warden Wages 


1,450 





1,450 


1,450 





Tree Department Expenses 


10,000 


5,002 


15,002 


15,002 





Civil Defense Wages 


500 





500 


500 





Civil Defense Expense 


680 





680 





680 


Dog Officer Wages 


800 





800 


200 


600 


Dog Officer Expenses 


700 


354 


1,054 


702 


352 


Field Driver Fence Viewer Sal. 


175 





175 





175 


Inspections Services Sal. 


25,729 


500 


26,229 


26,200 


29 



15 



Departmental 


Original 


Addition 


Total 


Total Spent 


Balance 




Appropriation 


Transfer 


Available 


Encumbered 


Reverted 


Inspections Services Expenses 


2,400 





2,400 


2,106 


294 


Insp of Animal & Slaughter 


700 





700 


549 


151 


Sewer Commissioners Salary 


2,760 





2,760 


2,760 





Sewer Dept. Wages 


73,146 





73,146 


72,084 


1,062 


Sewer Dept. Expense 


93,175 


9 


93,184 


93,184 





Board of Health Salaries 


10,000 





10,000 


10,000 





Board of Health Expenses 


1,200 





1,200 


815 


385 


Emergency Planning Comm. 


1,120 





1,120 


1,072 


48 


Solid Waste & Dump Main Wages 


23,846 





23,846 


20,568 


3,278 


Solid Waste & Dump Main Expense 


28,150 





28,150 


26,407 


1,743 


Highway Department Sal. & Wage 


169,544 





169,544 


169,544 





Highway Dept. Overtime 


10,000 


4,044 


14,044 


14,044 





Highway Dept Operating Exp. 


119,615 


5,936 


125,551 


125,551 





Streetlights 


23,700 





23,700 


22,619 


1,081 


Veteran's Service Salaries 


450 





450 


450 





Veteran's Service Expense 


3,050 





3,050 


71 


2,979 


Memorial Day 


1,800 





1,800 


994 


806 


Schools 


2,428,200 


1,400 


2,429,600 


2,429,600 





Vocational Tuition & Trans 


195,080 





195,080 


158,997 


36,083 


Library Wages 


29,999 


7 


30,006 


30,006 





Library Expense 


17,550 





17,550 


17,550 





Council on Aging Wages 


12,731 





12,731 


12,731 





Council on Aging Expenses 


1,150 





1,150 


843 


307 


Transportation of Elderly Wag 


8,446 


1,384 


9,830 


9,830 





Transportation of Elderly Exp 


2,800 


1,300 


4,100 


3,757 


343 


Recreation Wages 


2,250 





2,250 


1,870 


380 


Recreation Expenses 


5,075 





5,075 


3,600 


1,475 


Cultural Council Expense 


25 





25 


22 


3 


Comp. Soft and Support Exp 


3,500 





3,500 


3,300 


200 


Office Supp. & Equip Exp. 


3,600 





3,600 


3,538 


62 


Print Deliver Town Reports 


2,190 





2,190 


2,001 


189 


Finance Comm Reserve Fund 


50,000 


-24,937 


25,063 





25,063 


Insurance 


54,549 





54,549 


40,683 


13,866 


Chap. 32B Insurance 


130,000 





130,000 


109,866 


20,134 


Social Security/Medicare 


19,250 


302 


19,552 


19,552 





Town Clock Maintenance 


630 





630 


90 


540 


Water Commissioner's Salary 


2,760 





2,760 


2,393 


367 


Water Dept Wages 


75,369 





75,369 


34,923 


40,446 


Water Dept. Expense 


105,990 





105,990 


54,379 


51,611 


Cemetery Expense 


5,950 


325 


6,275 


6,275 





Interest Probable 


116,045 





116,045 


103,248 


12,797 


School Loan - Jr-Sr. Hs. 


160,000 





160,000 


160,000 





Interest on School Loan 


27,280 





27,280 


27,280 





Sewer Construction Loan 


110,000 





110,000 


110,000 





Interest on Sewer Const. Loan 


25,410 





25,410 


25,410 





Sewer Extension Loan 


15,000 





15,000 


15,000 





Sewer Extension Interest 


11,750 





11,750 


11,750 





Water Loan - Filtration 


65,000 





65,000 


65,000 





Water Interest - Filtration 


2,633 





2,633 


2,633 





Ambulance Building Loan 


28,400 





28,400 


28,400 





Assessors Map Loan 


37,500 





37,500 


37,500 





Municipal Loan Interest 


8,077 





8,077 


8,077 





Smith Academy Roof Design 


30,000 





30,000 


30,000 






4,884,254 



4,884,254 



4,637,019 



247,235 



16 



TOWN COLLECTOR 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1997 



Outstanding 
Balance 





Balance 


Committed 


Collected 


Abated 


Refund Tax Title 


Liens June 30, 1997 


REAL ESTATE 
















1993 


409.87 




409.87 








- 


1994 


15,068.72 




13,406.62 






1,662.10 


- 


1995 


53,856.71 




27,229.81 


7,180.41 


7,180.41 


1,717.84 


24,909.06 


1996 


130,412.14 




63,290.50 


7,782.77 


7,782.77 


2,241.88 


64,879.76 


1997 




2,948,131.46 


2,773,482.22 


50,748.82 


4,842.11 


13,758.96 


114,983.57 


ROLL BACK TAXES 
















1994 


7,795.34 






7,795.34 








1996 


6,215.09 




163.98 








6,051.11 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 
















1982 


284.40 












284.40 


1983 


22.58 












22.58 


1984 


23.52 












23.52 


1985 


39.20 












39.20 


1986 


205.92 












205.92 


1987 


1,006.60 




238.00 


733.60 






35.00 


1988 


686.25 












686.25 


1989 


1,173.20 




936.80 


216.40 






20.00 


1990 


600.91 




444.60 








156.31 


1991 


1,334.58 




409.00 








925.58 


1992 


848.41 




81.65 


541.62 






225.14 


1993 


755.99 




156.04 


599.95 






- 


1994 


845.46 






693.00 






152.46 


1995 


1,795.05 






1,150.86 






644.19 


1996 


3,021.37 




1,122.57 


1,298.46 






2,452.91 


1997 




130,671.39 


127,895.66 


448.48 


125.66 






FARMS 
















1993 


534.50 




48.00 








486.50 


1997 




2,031.13 


1,907.13 


80.00 


80.00 




124.00 


WATER 
















1995 


9,133.20 




317.00 








8,816.20 


1996 




317,988.73 


296,359.26 


926.00 


477.00 




12,846.47 


WATER LIENS 
















1994 


137.99 




137.99 








- 


1995 


353.78 




353.78 








- 


1996 


3,581.81 




2,663.38 








918.43 


1997 




10,418.41 


8,915.55 






665.38 


837.48 


SEWER 
















1996 


7,770.00 




1,790.00 








5,980.00 


1997 




171,275.00 


156,561.39 


7,146.00 


476.00 




8,043.61 



17 



Outstanding 
Balance 





Balance 


Committed 


Collected 


Abated 


Refund 


SEWER LIENS 












1994 


169.03 




169.03 






1995 


319.77 




319.77 






1996 


745.03 




152.77 






1997 




7,002.70 


5,759.81 






AMBULANCE 


33,060.29 


55,154.86 


35,941.76 


4,375.13 




PARKING FINES 


60.00 


15.00 








DOG FINES 




64.00 


64.00 






CEMETERY 




17.50 


17.50 






MOBILE HOMES 




5,760.00 


5,760.00 






MOTOR VEHICLE 












1988 


2,052.18 




5.00 






1989 


1,526.47 




13.13 






1990 


2,630.54 




119.17 






1991 


1,249.70 










1992 


1,207.07 




21.04 






1993 


1,252.73 




113.96 






1994 


2,153.54 




172.92 






1995 


4,040.94 


2,181.79 


4,163.88 






1996 


24,429.51 


64,929.66 


85,173.25 


4,162.74 


3,169.78 


1997 




295,719.99 


268,932.41 


3,551.48 


2,163.91 


SPECIAL FARM & REPAIR PLATES 










1994 


1,467.10 




59.60 


11.25 




1995 




3,665.07 


1,231.57 


2,702.46 


300.21 



626.53 



Respectfully Submitted. 

Joanne M. Porada 
Town Collector 



592.26 
616.36 

47,898.26 

75.00 



2,047.18 
1,513.34 
2,511.37 
1,249.70 
1,186.03 
1,138.77 
1,980.62 
2,058.85 
3,192.96 
25,400.01 



1,396.25 
31.25 



18 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Upon the completion of hearing and reviewing abatement 
requests for fiscal year 1997 in January, the Board conducted an 
informational meeting on forestry (Chapter 61), agricultural 
(Chapter 61 A) and recreational (Chapter 6 IB) land with John 
Slatery of the Massachusetts Farm Bureau as a guest speaker. 
The meeting was very well attended and a lot of good questions 
were fielded by Mr. Slatery who was the primary author of the 
Chapter Land legislation some eighteen years ago. Topics dis- 
cussed included clarifications of "farm land", "nonproductive 
land", "commonality of ownership", and "contiguous land" 
which helped ease the process in filing and reviewing applica- 
tions this past year. 

Hatfield began a new era this year with the institution of 
new town maps which are a vast improvement over the old maps. 
The Department of Revenue mandated the maps be instituted 
for fiscal year 1998 tax bills. As with anything new, it takes people 
time to adjust. Many people found it disconcerting to see a dif- 
ferent acreage on their tax bill. As more property owners submit 
surveys on digital media referencing the geographic point sys- 
tem, the maps will become even more accurate. In order for this 
to happen, the town needs to adopt new regulations for the sub- 
mission of plans and subdivisions. The new maps give more 
detailed information such as property measurements (when avail- 
able from deed or survey), acreage, and topographical features. 
Every parcel in town was assigned a new map and lot number 
which meant that all 2,039 parcels on the database had to be 
changed. The triennial revaluation for fiscal year 1998 began in 
July. Every three years, towns are mandated to update property 
values according to market value. Some building values increased 
due to sales of similar properties in town, some decreased. Due 
to the map conversion and the revaluation the Board notified all 
town financial departments in April that real estate tax bills would 
be delayed until December. The Department of Revenue issued 
final certification of values in November. A classification hear- 
ing was held by the Board of Selectmen in early December. Tax 
bills were mailed out before the holidays. 

With the advent of the new maps, which are in digital for- 
mat, the board conducted informational meetings on G.I.S. (Geo- 
graphical Information System) in the spring and fall. The first 
step in bringing this new technology to work for all departments 
of the town will be a needs analysis. An in-depth questionnaire 
was prepared by Ray Remillard of Remillard Associates and dis- 
tributed to all boards, committees and departments as a first step 
to pursuing grants available to the town in creating a full G.I.S. 
system. 

As part of our office restructuring, the position of Admin- 
istrative Assistant Assessor was created. The qualifications for 
this position bring professional appraisal skills, objectivity, and 
years of experience working with the Department of Revenue 
for purposes of accurate assessment and a reduction of expenses 
in future town revaluations. JoAnn Greenleaf, who resides in 



Gill, has worked in the assessing profession since 1984. As you 
may know, JoAnn helped out as a consultant to the board when 
the office was going through a particularly difficult time. Since 
July, the office hours have been extended to Monday through 
Friday 8:00 - 12:00 and 12:30 - 4:30 and on Wednesday evening 
from 6:00 - 7:00 P.M. The office has received many compli- 
ments on the convenient hours and availability of information. 
In order to offset the increase in our operating budget for this 
new position the Assessors have voluntarily reduced their sala- 
ries for fiscal year 1998 and 1999 by almost 50% and have also 
reduced office expenses as well. 

We encourage taxpayers to visit the office to meet with us 
and to review their property information. We would like to take 
this opportunity to thank you for your continued cooperation 
and assistance. 

Ronald Punska, Chairman 
Christopher Smith, Clerk 
Alexander Ciszewski 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Tax Rate Recapitulation 

Total Appropriations $6, 1 46,225 .06 

Cherry Sheet Deficits $4,854.00 

Cherry Sheet Charges $14,447.00 

Allowance for Abatements & Exemptions $80,533.01 

Total Amount to be Raised $6,246,059.07 

State Estimated Receipts $ 1 ,000,208 .00 

Local Estimated Receipts $998,800.00 

Free Cash $570,353.29 

Other Available Funds $550,662.80 

Total Estimated Receipts $3,120,024.09 

Fiscal Year 1998 Tax Levy $3,126,034.98 

The fiscal year 1998 tax rate was approved by the Depart- 
ment of Revenue on December 11, 1997. The real estate and 
personal property tax bills were mailed on December 17, 1997. 



Valuation by Class 



Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 

Total Value 



$176,325,277 

$61,660,843 

$10,044,935 

$9,679,990 

$257,711,045 



% Levy by Class 

68.4198 

23.9263 

3.8978 

3.7561 



There are 2,039 real estate parcels in the Town of Hatfield 
and 149 personal property accounts. 



19 



ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS GRANTED 

Abatement information for FY98 Real Estate and Personal 
Property taxes was not available when this report was prepared. 



Number of Real Estate 
exemptions for FY98 



40 

37 

3 

1 

1 



Type Amount 

Veterans $12,100.00 

Elderly (Persons over 70) $ 1 8,500.00 

Blind $1,312.50 
Spouse of a fireman killed 



in the line of duty 

Financial Hardship, 
Age & Infirmity 



$1,741.87 



$500.00 

Total Amount Granted* $34,154.37 

( incomplete when this report was prepared) 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

# of bills Total Value Total Tax 

Levy 1997 4,477 17,895,650 $387,917.47 

Levy 1996 182 1,509,093 $11,225.64 

# of Abatements Amount Abated 

Levy 1997 119 $5,520.05 

Levy 1996 22 $852.41 



20 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

ANNUAL CENSUS 

The annual census was conducted by mail during the month of January. The complete listing of residents was prepared and 
various reports, such as the jury list, the school lists, and the elderly lists were distributed. The population as of January 1, 1997 was 
3,390. As we approach the finalization of the January 1, 1998 census, the population has shown a slight increase. The current popula- 
tion is 3443. Copies of the annual street list are available at the Town Clerk's office. 

VOTER REGISTRATION 

Voter registration sessions were held, as required by law, prior to all town meetings and elections. Mail-in voter registration as 
well as registration at the Registry of Motor Vehicles has helped to increase the number of registered voters. The official voting list 
was updated and distributed prior to each election. 



Event 


Date 


Total 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Unenrolled 


All others 


Special Town Meeting 


4-14-97 


2,281 


969 


207 


1,099 


3 


Annual Town Meeting & 


5-13-97 












Elections 


5-20-97 


2,278 


968 


206 


1,098 


6 


Special Town Meeting 


11-20-97 


2,307 


975 


208 


1,118 


6 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mildred Z. Osley, Chairman 
Helen H. Bardwell 
Ruth Kuchyt 
G. Louise Slysz, Clerk 



21 



TOWN CLERK 



VITAL STATISTICS 















FISH AND GAME LICENSES 


The certificates for births, 


deaths, and 


marriages 


are re- 


1997 SALES 


corded in the Town Clerk's Office. 


Certified 


copies are 


avail- 




able for $5.00 each. 












Fishing 
Half-Price Fishing 


1997 Events 


Births 




Deaths 


Marriages 


Free Fishing 


Male 


19 




9 




8 


Non-resident Fishing 


Female 


15 




21 







Hunting 
Half-Price Hunting 
















34 




30 




8 


Sporting 
Half-price Sporting 


Preceding 












Free Sporting 


Five Years 












Duplicates 


1996 


28 




29 




13 


Waterfowl Stamps 


1995 


24 




25 




21 


Primitive Firearms 


1994 


37 




29 




11 


Wildland Conservation Stamps 


1993 


33 




24 




20 


Archery 


1992 


33 




32 




20 


Total Sales 




DOG LICENSES 









Dog licenses are renewed annually by April 1st. The cur- 
rent fees are as follows: Males - $4.00; Females - $8.00; Spayed 
Females - $4.00; Kennels - $ 1 0.00 and $25 .00; A penalty of $ 1 .00 
per month is assessed beginning May 1st for late registration. 



Sales 1997 

Males 
Females 
Spayed Females 
Dog Kennel 
Total Sales 

Total Receipts 

License Fees 

Late Fines 

Late Fines Refunded 

Preceding Five Years 

Year 1996 1995 1994 

Sales 330 349 345 



150 

25 

170 

1 

346 

$1,598.00 

1,505.00 

93.00 

(23.00) 



1993 1992 

178 155 



Total Receipts: $4,269.35 



Preceding Years 

Year 1996 1995 

Sales 335 387 



State Funds 
Local Funds 



1994 

457 



1993 

481 



46 

4 
13 

4 
19 

1 
47 

2 
33 

4 

15 

12 

125 

16 

343 

$4,085.00 
184.35 



1992 

503 



VARIOUS LICENSES/PERMITS/FILINGS 
1997 



Burial Permits 

Business Certificates 

Gasoline Storage Permits 

Homestead Filing 

Pole Locations 

Raffle Permits 

Special Permit Applications 

Street Lists 

Subdivision Plan 

Town By-Laws, Sale of 

UCC: Filings 

Searches 

Terminations 
Vital Statistics - Certified Copies 

Marriage Intentions 
ZBA - Variance Applications 
Zoning By-laws, Sale of 
Zoning Maps, Sale of 



Total 


Total Receipts 


8 


$80.00 


20 


400.00 


40 


400.00 


1 


10.00 


3 


80.00 


4 


40.00 


7 


1,706.00 


32 


160.00 


1 


224.00 


2 


6.00 


61 


610.00 


9 


90.00 


11 


55.00 


204 


1,020.00 


8 


120.00 


4 


858.00 


29 


87.00 


9 


90.00 



22 



TOWN MEETING EXCERPTS 



A complete record of all articles voted upon at Town Meet- 
ings is available at the Town Clerk's office. The following ex- 
cerpts are a summary of the more significant articles. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 24, 1997 



ARTICLE 14 Voted to rescind the borrowing for repairs or 
reconstruction of Running Gutter Brook Dam. 

ARTICLE 15 Voted $77,000.00 to the Capital Planning Ac- 
count for purposes recommended by the Capi- 
tal Planning Committee as follows: 



ARTICLE 1 Voted $ 1 ,733,500 to finance the construction 
of sewer improvements for Bridge Street, Gore 
Avenue, Prospect Street, south of Chestnut, 
Prospect Court, School Street west of Pros- 
pect, Plantation Road, Winterberry Lane, 
Chestnut Street, and Porter Avenue area: 
$38,500.00 from Sewer Surplus and to bor- 
row $1,695,000. Yes 156 No 14 

ARTICLE 2 Voted to borrow $ 1 ,400,000 for roadway and 
drainage improvements for Bridge Street and 
Gore Avenue. 

Yes 156 No 14 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 13, 1997 

ARTICLE 4 Amended the Town By-Laws, by adding "No 
person, other than a person removing snow 
and/or ice under the direction of state or local 
government, shall place or cause to be placed 
any snow or ice on any public way or on any 
private way which serves as access to any 
building. The penalty provisions of Section 
2.02B of the Town By-Laws shall apply, and 
this Section may be enforced under the provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws Chap- 
ter 40, Section 2 ID. 

ARTICLE 5 Voted to accept Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 40, Sections 13A and 13 C relative to 
workers compensation self-insurance funds. 

ARTICLE 6 Voted to $29,45 1 .00 to fund the Workers Com- 
pensation Insurance Trust Fund. 

ARTICLE 9 Voted to accept Mass. General Laws, Chapter 
59, section 21c, paragraph n, relative to as- 
sessing taxes for water or sewer debt service 
charges in excess of Proposition 2 1/2. 

ARTICLE 10 Voted $ 1 1 6,977.00 for the Hampshire County 
Retirement System. 



Library, Handicapped Access Ramp to Building 8,000.00 

Breor School, Heating Oil Tank Removal 5,000.00 

Police Department, New 4WD Cruiser 30,000.00 

Town Hall, Town Hall Restoration Projects 20,000.00 
Council on Aging, Kitchen Equipment, Updates 

and Floor Covering 14,000.00 

And from Water Available Surplus $35,000.00 for the pur- 
chase of a Water Department Truck. 



ARTICLE 16 Voted $3 1 ,324.00 to the Capital Improvement 
Planning Account for the funding of the first 
year of a five-year Technology Plan. 

ARTICLE 17 Voted $2,000.00 for the purpose of contract- 
ing for consultant services to determine the 
technology needs of the Town. 

ARTICLE 18 Voted $8,000.00 for legal services incurred re- 
garding Court appeals filed by Labrie Stone 
Products, Inc. relative to the decisions of the 
Zoning Board of Appeals and the Planning 
Board. 

ARTICLE 19 Voted $20, 1 28.00 for the purpose of settling 
litigation pending before the Bureau of Spe- 
cial Education Appeals of the Department of 
Education for the Commonwealth of Massa 
chusetts. 

ARTICLE 20 Voted $3 1 ,644 for the purchase of auto extri- 
cation emergency equipment. 

ARTICLE 21 Voted $35,500.00 to fund engineering costs 
related to the construction phase of the land- 
fill capping project. 

ARTICLE 22 Voted to borrow $600,000.00 for the closure 
of the Hatfield Landfill. 

ARTICLE 23 Voted to approve the donation of surplus 
books, as determined by the Library Trustees, 
to the Friends of the Hatfield Library, Inc., a 
non profit organization. 



23 



ARTICLE 24 Voted an easement to the Tobacco Barn or shed 
on Billings Way. 

ARTICLE 25 Voted to acquire three parcels of land for pur- 
poses of the sewer and road projects voted at 
the April 24, 1997 Special Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 26 Voted $8,000.00 to fund a consultant for the 
1998 re-evaluation. 

ARTICLE 27 Voted $ 10,000.00 to fund a consultant or con- 
sultants for the work to be done in conjunc- 
tion with the 1998 re-evaluation. 

ARTICLE 28 Voted $4,5 1 1 ,573.00 to defray the charges and 
expenses for the Town, including debt and in- 
terest; to set the salaries for all elected offi- 
cials and to provide for a Reserve Fund for 
the ensuing year as follows: 



Funding Summary 



Taxation 
Free cash 
Water Revenues 
Water Available Surplus 
Sewer Revenue 
Ambulance Surplus 



4,511,573.00 
300,000.00 
189,290.00 
100,000.00 
195,741.00 
45,000.00 

5,341,604.00 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTIONS 



Water Commissioner 3 Years Christopher F. Miller 68 1 

Water Commissioner 1 Year Sandra D. Shields 715 

Library Trustee 3 Years Jane A. Scavotto 619 
Elector under the will 



Cemetery Commissioner 3 Years 

Sewer Commissioner 3 Years 

Board of Health 3 Years 

Planning Board 5 Years 

Housing Authority 5 Years 

County Commissioner 2 Years 



Edward S. Kowalski 797 

Anthony Gillespie 786 

Stanley J. Sliwoski 557 

Daniel P. Barry 760 

Alice W. Maiewski 773 

Sean M. Barry 774 



ARTICLE 2 



ARTICLE 3 



ARTICLE 4 



ARTICLE 5 





MAY 20, 


1997 




ARTICLE 6 




TOTAL VOTE CAST 99 1 




ARTICLE 7 




REGULAR 


975 








ABSENTEE 


16 




ARTICLE 8 


Selectman 


3 Years 


E. Lary Grossman 


694 




Assessor 


3 Years 


Ronald J. Punska 


767 




School Committee 3 Years 


Janice M. Davis 


521 






3 Years 


Janet R. Szych 


753 





SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
NOVEMBER 20, 1997 

Voted $200,000.00 for water pollution abate- 
ment facility projects; repair, replacement and/ 
or upgrade of septic systems, that project and 
financing costs shall be repaid by the prop- 
erty owners. 

Voted $2,225.59 to pay bills from a prior fis- 
cal year as follows: 

Voted $38,000.00 for the removal and replace- 
ment of fuel storage tanks at the Highway ga- 
rage. 

Voted $5,000.00 for legal and other expenses 
to be incurred in the redemption and foreclo- 
sure of tax titles. 

Voted $4,000.00 for the purchase of software 
to support the Town's accounting function. 

Voted $30,000.00 for the operation and main- 
tenance of the Hatfield Sewer Department. 

Voted $ 1 5,000.00 for the redevelopment of the 
Omasta Well. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Louise Slysz, Town Clerk 



of Oliver Smith 



1 Year Henry P. Betsold 



840 



24 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

In Account with the Town of Hatfield 
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 



Cash Book Balance July 1, 1996 

Receipts 

July-96 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-97 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



1,462,215.17 

1,274,257.35 

1,375,185.59 

1,434,703.18 

2,136,412.11 

1,079,816.35 

543,380.28 

299,175,66 

384,517.89 

1,016,904.93 

3,240,561.28 

3,067,449.91 



2,054,702.11 



TOTAL RECEIPTS 



17,314,579.70 



Disbursements 

July-96 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-97 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



1,168,683.81 

1,405,337.08 

1,790,798.48 

745,079.94 

1,383,807.54 

608,428.07 

836,975.95 

700,967.96 

719,732.16 

3,003,214.07 

406,881.91 

3,394,134.14 



19,369,281.81 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 



Cash Book Balance June 30, 1997 



16,164,041.11 

3,205,240.70 

19,369,281.81 



25 



ANALYSIS OF CASH 
June 30, 1997 



General Cash 



2,602,262.10 



Trust Funds 

Ambulance 

Anniversary Trust 

Boli, Maude Morton 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Graduation Trust Fund 

Slysz, Michael R. N. R. Fund 

Smith Academy Student Activities 

Stabilization Fund 

Tobacco Shed Maintenance Trust 

Unemployment Fund 

Workmen's Compensation 

Total Trust Fund 



32,375.30 

3,057.16 

46,745.19 

57,662.36 

61,377.65 

7,100.30 

28,467.25 

306,537.49 

10,027.11 

20,097.95 

29,530.84 



602,978.60 



Total Cash 



3,205,240.70 



INTEREST INCOME 
Fiscal Year 1997 



General Cash 



161,301.81 



Trust Funds 

Ambulance 

Anniversary Trust 

Boli, Maude Morton 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Graduation Award 

Slysz, Michael R. 

Smith Academy Student Activities Account 

Stabilization Fund 

Tobacco Shed Maintenance Trust 

Unemployment Fund 

Workmen's Compensation Insurance Trust Fund 

TOTAL INTEREST INCOME 



1,461.48 

157.17 

2,606.29 

3,031.57 

3,407.95 

365.06 

1,060.88 

15,759.80 

27.11 

1,044.94 

79.84 



29,002.09 



190,303.90 



26 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Balance July 1, 1996 
Deposits 
Withdrawals 
Interest 



Balance, June 30, 1997 
Balance July 1, 1996 
Interest 



TRUST FUNDS 
Ambulance Fund 



Anniversary Trust 



25,753.82 
5,160.00 

1,461.48 

32,375.30 



2,899.99 
157.17 

3,057.16 



32,375.30 



32,375.30 



3,057.16 



3,057.16 



Maude Morton Boli Alumna Fund 



Balance, June 30, 1997 
Balance July 1, 1996 
Withdrawals 
Interest 



Non-expendible balance 



Balance, June 30, 1997 
Balance July 1, 1996 
Deposits 



In account with the Town of Hatfield 

In account with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



46,745.19 



42,947.58 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 



57,662.36 
300.00 



49,189.90 
5,051.00 
2,606.29 

46,745.19 



57,462.36 
200.00 

57,662.36 



46,745.19 



57,762.36 



57,762.36 



New Perpetual Care Accounts 
Guillemette, Doris 



200.00 



27 



Graduation Awards 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Balance July 1, 1996 
Deposits 
Interest 
Disbursements 



Non-expendible Trust Balance 
Adams, John and Christine 
Bell, Tyler Scott 
Boyle, Martha Pelissier 
Class of 1976 
Class of 1977 
Class of 1986 
Cutter, Carol 
Demers, Brenda 
Denn, Maureen 
Hatfield Fyfe & Drum Corp 
Hatfield Soccer Association 
Hillard, Stephen 
Kochan, Frank 
Lesukoski, John 
Lions Club 
Mokrecki, Sophie 
Novak, Suzanne 
Osley, Brenda 
Potyrala, Edward 
Ryan, Robert 
Skarzynski, John 
Smiarowski, Teddy 

Women's Club of the Holy Trinity Church 
Zembiski, Patricia 



61,377.65 



56,858.60 
3,520.88 
3,407.95 
2,409.78 

61,377.65 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,135.00 

300.00 

471.64 
1,180.13 
5,706.00 

905.44 
1,856.37 

500.00 
1,757.72 
1,001.00 
1,165.00 
1,000.00 
15,297.31 
1,000.00 

995.00 
1,889.88 
1,740.00 
5,400.00 
1,000.00 
1,425.00 

525.00 

650.00 



61,377.65 



28 



Award 


Balance 
July 1, 1996 


Deposits 


Interest 


Withdrawals 


Balance 
June 30, 1997 


Adams, John & Christine 


1,105.20 




64.65 


25.00 


1,144.85 


Bell, Tyler Scott 


1,024.17 


35.09 


59.72 


100.00 


1,018.98 


Boyle, Martha Pelissier 


2,164.49 




126.30 


115.58 


2,175.21 


Class of 1976 


323.80 




18.94 


15.00 


327.74 


Class of 1977 


521.49 




30.46 


25.00 


526.95 


Class of 1986 


1,282.39 




74.97 


35.00 


1,322.36 


Cutter, Carol 


4,417.03 


2,500.00 


347.52 




7.264.55 


Demers, Brenda 


979.95 




57.17 


50.00 


987.12 


Denn, Maureen 


1,986.79 




115.94 


100.00 


2,002.73 


Hatfield Fyfe & Drum Corp 


696.17 




40.56 


50.00 


686.73 


Hatfield Soccer Association 


1,798.03 




105.13 


50.00 


1,853.16 


Hillard, Stephen 


1,163.14 




68.15 




1,231.29 


Kiwanis Club of Northampton 


1,354.48 




78.21 


250.00 


1,182.69 


Kochan, Frank 


1,328.65 




77.63 


50.00 


1,356.28 


Lesukoski, John 


1,065.44 




62.21 


50.00 


1,077.65 


Lions Club 


15,833.23 




909.88 


500.00 


16,243.11 


Mokrecki, Sophie 


1,022.76 


26.57 


59.63 


90.00 


1,018.96 


Novak, Suzanne 


1,094.46 




63.91 


50.00 


1,108.37 


Osley, Brenda 


1,998.70 




116.65 


100.00 


2,015.35 


Potyrala, Edward 


1,859.64 




108.73 


50.00 


1,918.37 


Ryan, Robert 


5,380.67 


650.00 


316.84 


300.00 


6,047.51 


Skarzynski, John 


1,013.87 




59.16 


54.20 


1,018.83 


Smiarowski, Teddy 


1,419.33 


49.22 


83.27 


100.00 


1,451.82 


Theberge, Peter 


4,751.40 


260.00 


287.95 


200.00 


5,099.35 


Women's Club 


539.74 




31.49 


25.00 


546.23 


Zembiski, Patricia 


733.58 




42.88 


25.00 


751.46 



56,858.60 



3,520.88 



3,407.95 



2,409.78 



61,377.65 



Michael R. Slysz Memorial Fund 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Balance July 1, 1996 
Interest 



Non-expendible trust balance 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Opening Balance October 1, 1996 

Deposits 

Withdrawals 

Interest 



6,051.50 
Smith Academy Student Activities Account 



6,735.24 
365.06 

7,100.30 



33,833.69 

53,851.82 

60,279.14 

1,060.88 

28,467.25 



7,100.30 



7,100.30 



28,467.25 



28,467.25 



29 



Stabilization Fund 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Balance July 1, 1996 
Interest 



290,777.69 
15,759.80 

306,537.49 



306,537.49 



Tobacco Shed Maintenance Trust 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Opening Balance June 10, 1997 
Interest 



10,000.00 
27.11 

10,027.11 



10,027.11 



10,027.11 



Unemployment Fund 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Balance July 1, 1996 

Interest 

Withdrawals 



20,219.85 
1,044.94 
1,166.84 

20,097.95 



20,097.95 



20,097.95 



Workers' Compensation Insurance Trust Fund 



Balance June 30, 1997 

Opening Balance June 10, 1997 
Interest 



29,451.00 
79.84 

29,530.84 



29,530.84 



29,530.84 



30 



TAX TITLE ACCOUNTS 



Assessed Owner Map/Lot 


Balance 


Subsequent 


Payment 




Balance 




July 1, 1996 


taxes 


Tax Title 


Add'l Interest 


June 30, 1997 


Diggins, John & Marion 


9,099.19 


1,986.60 






11,085.79 


Dulaski, Robert 




2,071.86 


2,071.86 


93.72 


- 


Holich, Estate of John 


19,124.65 


2,672.35 






21,797.00 


Lavallee, Ronald & Deborah 


18,516.46 


3,104.19 






21,620.65 


Lee, Walter A. 


1,721.09 


171.79 






1,892.88 


Lorys, Catherine 


260.37 


103.11 






363.48 


*Maslanka, Frank 


1,098.96 


40.48 






1,139.44 


Owners Unknown - 8 parcels 


23,421.31 


5,752.98 






29,174.29 


Skarzynski, Estate of John 




5,312.88 


417.26 




4,895.62 


Skarzynski, Estate of John 




1,560.66 


478.02 


21.98 


1,082.64 


Stratton, Deborah 


6,585.03 






1,118.67 


6,585.03 


Thompson Ralph R. 


2,677.36 


222.60 






2,899.96 




82,504.42 


22,999.50 


2,967.14 


1,234.37 


102,536.78 



*Foreclosed, pending auction 

Please note that since June 30, 1997, the following transactions have occurred on the tax title accounts. One owner unknown 
parcel has been disclaimed by the Board of Assessors and reassessed. The 2 parcels assessed to the estate of John Skarzynski and the 
parcel of Ralph R. Thompson have been redeemed. Aggressive measures are being taken to collect all tax title accounts. However, 
such matters as bankruptcy and mortgages affect the steps that can be taken. Land court proceedings are beginning for all parcels 
eligible for that action. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Louise Slysz 
Treasurer 



31 



WAGE REPORT 
FISCAL YEAR 1997 



The following is a listing of the employees paid through the Town of Hatfield during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1 997. Some 
wages were funded under Federal and State grants. 

Abarno, Frank E. 
Abrahamson, Barbara A. 
Adamski, Nikolas Jan 
Albino, Susan 
Altman, William 
Archambault, Lisa A. 
Baker, Douglass R. 

Balise, Margaret M. 
Banas, Laurie J. 
Baranoski, Kathleen L. 
Barbuto, Rocco 
Bardwell, A. Cory 
Bardwell, Helen H. 
Bardwell, Jonathan 
Barry, Garrett 
Barsh, Gerald M. Jr. 
Barstow, Matthew C. 

Beauregard, Kathleen A. 
Belden, Arthur W 
Belden, Richard D. 
Belden, William A. 
Berniche, Thomas F 
Betsold, Brian 
Betsold, Henry R 
Betsold, Jane M. 
Bonk, Frank H. 
Boyer, Joan B. 
Boyle, William F 

Breen-Pomeroy, Susan 
Broussard, Malcolm 
Brown, Brian 
Brunelle, Renee B. 
Burgess, Mary L. 
Burke, Susan C. 
Burrington, Richard E. 
Bybee, Krista 
Cadran, Michael 
Cahill, J. Michael 
Campbell, Norman C. 
Canton, David 
Celatka, Frances F 
Celatka, Theodore, Jr. 
Chagnon, Robert M. 
Chase, Anne 
Chase, Gregson F 
Chmura, Catherine 



50,812.50 


Principal - H.S. 


5,805.80 


Secretary - School 


233.00 


Fireman 


42,932.00 


Speech Therapist 


135.00 


Substitute 


20.00 


Recreation 


587.16 


Fireman 


335.52 


EMT 


10,725.00 


Food Service - School 


605.80 


EMT 


167.00 


Chaperone 


3,060.00 


Baseball Coach 


4,000.00 


Board of Health 


405.13 


Registrar of Voters 


679.60 


Fireman 


177.08 


Fireman 


968.00 


Summer Highway 


1,607.70 


Police 


184.00 


Private Duty 


9,576.87 


SPED Aide 


190.00 


C.O.A. Driver 


87.48 


Landfill Substitute 


1,699.76 


Fireman 


820.00 


Water Commissioner 


60.00 


Recreation 


25.00 


Elector, Oliver Smith Will 


17,863.98 


Council on Aging Director/Driver 


7,127.60 


Town Hall Custodian 


10.00 


Election Worker 


93.20 


Policeman 


287.50 


Private Duty 


139.80 


EMT 


773.56 


Fireman 


80.00 


Substitute 


1,500.00 


Substitute 


31,044.00 


Administrative Assistant 


1,448.32 


Speech Aide 


450.00 


Veterans' Agent 


19,497.96 


Assessors' Secretary 


32,754.10 


Teacher 


2,254.33 


Selectman 


1,450.00 


Tree Warden 


167.00 


Chaperone 


72.50 


Election Worker 


4,094.04 


Ambulance Manager 


90.00 


Substitute 


21,667.50 


Dir. Spec. Ed. 


167.76 


Fireman 


260.00 


Substitute 



32 



Ciaglo, Alfred J. Jr. 
Cimino, Thomas 
Ciszewski, Alexander W. 
Clark, Kathleen K. 
Conant, Sally 
Corliss, Donna D. 
Courtemanche, Denise 
Couture, Brenda G. 
Crepeau, James 

Czerniak, Karen A. 
Daughton, Tom 
Demski, Lauren H. 
Denisiewicz, Maxine 
Desmond, Giles 
Devlin, James A. 
Debrindisi, Greg A. 
Diklich, Davor 
Dostal, Eileen J. 
Dube, Jeremy 
Dunphy, Michael P. 
Dyer, John 
Dysinger, Helen 
Dzialo, Frederick J. 
Easley, Cathy D. 
Eddy, Shannon M. 
Englehardt, Catherine 
Erikson, Stephen C. 
Faszcza, Patricia A. 
Filipek, Anne B. 
Ravin, Katherine A. 
Folts, Janice B. 
Frenette, Mark W. 
Frieswyk, Emily A. 
Frieswyk, Margaret 
Gagnon, Gregory 
Gagnon, James O. 
Gaudette, Roland F 
Gaughan, Kerry 
Gaughan, Stephen P. 



Geryk, Walter 
Gillespie, Anthony 
Giroux, Patricia 
Glenowicz, Josephine B. 
Godek, Kathleen A. 
Golash, Susan E. 
Goll, Barbara 
Grossman, E. Lary 

Guyon, Andrea L. 
Hayward, Leondrea 
Hendrickson, Lari Jo 
Herfurth, Robert 



1,911.00 


Coach 


5,416.67 


Superintendent of Schools 


4,190.00 


Assessor 


36,118.00 


Teacher 


7,011.63 


Teachers' Aide 


12,731.30 


School Nurse 


167.00 


Chaperone 


39.12 


Substitute Secretary 


1,155.68 


Fireman 


1,220.92 


EMT 


32,510.76 


Teacher 


8,449.00 


Psychologist 


1,320.00 


Coach 


36,463.55 


Teacher 


50.00 


ZBA 


39,486.00 


Teacher 


1,248.88 


Fireman 


1,143.00 


Advisor 


11,065.94 


SPED Aide 


352.00 


Highway - Summer 


27,443.00 


Teacher 


171.55 


Asst. Gas Inspector 


270.00 


Substitute 


820.00 


Sewer Commissioner 


39,628.39 


Teacher 


9.32 


EMT 


80.00 


Substitute 


36,785.00 


Teacher 


27.50 


Election Worker 


20.00 


Election Worker 


5,170.40 


School Secretary 


10,300.49 


SPED Aide 


964.71 


Substitute 


500.00 


Summer School 


19,760.76 


Early Childhood Coord. 


734.99 


EMT 


54.85 


EMT 


3,162.00 


Coach 


226.31 


Clerical sub. 


1,971.28 


Summer Janitor 


1,174.32 


Fireman 


475.32 


EMT 


4,700.00 


Plumbing & Gas Inspector 


820.00 


Sewer Commissioner 


6,919.22 


School Lunch 


172.50 


Election Worker 


32.50 


Election Worker 


7,785.77 


Senior Clerk 


5,195.25 


Dining Director - COA 


300.00 


Planning Board 


241.60 


Selectman 


684.07 


Teacher's Aide 


160.00 


Substitute 


1,828.77 


Library Asst. 


496.26 


Driver 



33 



Hoey, Laura L. 
Hoffman, Christopher J. 



Holhut, Louise E. 
Holhut, Michael P. 

Hopkins, Giles S. 
Houle, Timothy M. 
Hudock, Teresa M. 
Hurley, David M. 
Hurley, Thomas J. 
Ingram, Sarah A. 
Jackewich, Timothy 
Jagodzinski, David F. 
Jepson, Dorcus 
Jewczyn- Kaiser, Olga 
Johnson, Scott A. 
Kabat, Thaddeus 
Keir, David R. 
Kellogg, Ruth 
Kempisty, Brenda 
Kempisty, Edward S. 
Klaes, Patricia D. 
Klepacki, James G. 
Koczajowski, Donna L. 
Koh, Dawn S. 
Korza, Diane M. 
Korza, William 
Korza, William 

Kubicz, David 
Kuchyt, Melinda J. 
Kuchyt, Ruth 

Kugler, Frances A. 
Kukucka, Paul W. 
Kwiecinski, Cynthia L. 
Kwiecinski, James P. 
Labbe, Rene 
Lampiasi, Kellyanne 
Lampron, Bernard C. 
Lapienski, Marion 
Larareo, Maureen M. 
Lavallee, James A. 
Lavallee, James A. 
Lavallee, Pearl G. 
Leslie, Jeannette L. 
Liebenow, David 
Lizek, David M. 
Lyman, Keith R. 
Lyons, Donna M. 
Maciorowski, Stafia 
Maiewski, Shirley S. 
Majewski, John 



28,801.20 


Preschool Teacher 


2,530.00 


Highway - Summer 


121.00 


Water - Summer 


1,545.00 


Substitute 


7,821.00 


School Lunch 


922.68 


Police 


684.25 


Private Duty 


38,802.00 


Teacher 


733.76 


Fireman 


20,508.56 


Town Secretary 


16,647.00 


Police Chief 


2,666.50 


Selectman 


39,288.00 


SPED Teacher 


1,239.56 


Fireman 


485.00 


Recreation 


38,934.00 


Teacher 


9,939.99 


SPED Aide 


2,007.50 


Highway - Summer 


50.00 


ZBA 


39,826.67 


Teacher 


34,058.00 


Teacher 


27,028.00 


School Secretary 


9,933.84 


Landfill asst. 


36,118.00 


Teacher 


28,674.70 


Highway 


2,153.00 


V. Softball Coach 


21,294.24 


Teacher 


37,742.76 


Teacher 


1,120.00 


Sewer Commissioner 


27,314.72 


Highway 


294.38 


Water Commissioner 


45.00 


Substitute 


340.00 


Substitute 


840.36 


Board of Registrars 


4,400.15 


Town Secretary 


172.50 


Election Worker 


27,171.14 


School Janitor 


10,567.90 


Substitute 


80.00 


Substitute 


128.45 


Asst. Plumbing Inspector 


500.00 


Summer School 


18,551.10 


Janitor 


2,980.80 


COA Van Driver 


2,930.00 


Substitute 


65.24 


Fireman 


27,478.26 


Highway 


30.00 


Election Worker 


245.83 


Driver 


167.00 


Chaperone 


300.00 


Electrical Inspector 


160.00 


Substitute 


39,236.38 


Guidance Counselor 


4,425.49 


School Lunch 


117.50 


Election Worker 


83.50 


Chaperone 



34 



Maksimoski, Laura E. 
Martula, A. Maureen 
McBroom, Richard A. 
McGee, Thomas J., Jr. 
McGlew, Edwin N. Ill 
McGrath, Brian D. 

Mew, Allison L. 
Milewski, Linda C. 
Miller, Christopher F. 

Miller, Robert F. 
Molloy, Edward D. 
Moriarty, Margaret L. 

Motyka, Frank L., Jr. 

Muellejans, Julie 
Myers, Barbara 
Nicholas, Bryan O. 
Nietsche, Judith R. 
Noyes, Worth 

O'Brien, Theresa A. 
Ober, Mark A. 

Olson, Gary R. 
Omasta, David 
Osborn, Mark 
Osborn, Whitney M. 
Osepowicz, Robert J. 

Osley, Mildred Z. 
Osley, Mollie B. 
Osley, Thomas J. 

Ouimet Richard 
Parsons, Lynn- Ann 

Pashek, William E. 
Paye, Beverly J. 
Pease, Jane 
Pease, John T. 
Pelis, Cessie 
Pelis, Robert 
Petcen, Barbara 
Petcen, Marcella 
Phaneuf, Thomas 

Phelps, Cynthia G. 
Phelps, Rebecca H. 
Phelps, Tara J. 
Plourde, Laurie 
Podmayer, Ethel M. 
Podmayer, William 



97.50 


Election Worker 


34,255.00 


Teacher 


1,191.23 


EMT 


500.00 


Substitute 


1,381.12 


Fireman 


32,174.68 


Asst. Plant Operator 


90.85 


Highway 


445.00 


Recreation 


207.63 


School Lunch 


35,522.16 


Highway Superintendent 


1,120.00 


Water Commissioner 


13,282.00 


Town Accountant 


300.00 


Planning Board 


1,235.00 


COA Driver 


878.80 


Library Maint. 


39,270.40 


Sewer Plant Operator 


199.87 


Highway 


18,517.00 


Art Teacher 


2,555.22 


School Lunch Sub. 


50.00 


ZBA 


7,730.64 


SPED Aide 


1,593.72 


EMT 


820.16 


Fire 


198.01 


School Lunch Sub, 


382.12 


Fireman 


242.32 


EMT 


209.07 


Driver - School 


67.24 


Water Commissioner 


40.00 


Substitute 


308.00 


Recreation 


4,913.00 


Fire Chief 


500.00 


Civil Defense 


379.66 


Registrar of Voters 


2,482.00 


Coach 


24,824.60 


Police 


2,985.87 


Private Duty 


1,320.00 


Coach 


10,398.36 


School Secretary 


510.40 


Water Comm. Secretary 


3,000.00 


Board of Health 


10,615.45 


Town Secretary 


7,132.38 


School Lunch 


1,820.92 


Fireman 


624.44 


EMT 


3,162.00 


Coach 


893.19 


School Lunch Director/School Secretary 


50.00 


Election Worker 


23,525.00 


School Janitor 


2,968.37 


School Driver 


39,279.00 


School Librarian 


32,598.01 


Teacher - Music 


20,432.44 


Teacher 


3,699.03 


Library Aide 


335.34 


COA Driver 


10,060.20 


Landfill Operator 



35 



Pomeroy, Scott 
Porada, Joanne 
Poulsen, Bruce C. 
Proulx, Rhonda 
Prucnal, Evelyn Hahn 

Punska, Joseph 
Punska, Ronald J. 
Rankin, John C. 
Reed, William P. 
Roberts, Wanda M. 
Rogaleski, Barrett 

Rogers, Tracey 
Roussell, Deborah M. 
Ryan, Judith 
Sadoski, Richard 
Sadowski, Stanley 
Sadowski, Thomas E., Jr. 
Sarage, Linda M. 
Scanlan, Hillary 
Schott, John 
Schriber, Jeremy J. 
Scott, William T. 
Shapiro, Theodore B. 
Shea, Richard D. 

Shea, Robert Jr. 
Shea, William J. 
Shields, Sandra 
Shifflett, Kristen R. 
Siegel, Lois 
Sikorski, Helen 
Skelton, Russell R. 
Sliwoski, Stanley F. 
Slysz, G. Louise 



Smiarowski, Bernard A. 
Smith, Christopher G. 
Smith, Elizabeth S. 
Smith, Geraldine 
Sokop, Judy 
Stahelek, Nancy 
Stenglein, Barbara M. 
Stiles, Michael 

Strong, Richard H. 
Strong, Teresa M. 
Sullivan, Kevin 
Sussbauer, Erik 
Symanski, Stanley L. 
Szewczyk, Stanley F. 
Szych, John F. 
Szych, Joseph A. 



2,310.17 


COA Driver 


428.72 


Fireman 


22,661.00 


Town Collector 


17,270.10 


School Psychologist 


2,472.50 


Substitute 


883.50 


Library - Sub 


267.32 


Sub-Secretary 


242.00 


Highway - Summer 


3,709.57 


Assessor 


3,126.79 


COA Driver 


85.00 


Substitute 


3,514.17 


Assistant Assessor 


186.40 


Fire 


466.00 


EMT 


568.52 


Fireman 


35,852.00 


Teacher 


29,980.88 


Teacher 


33,403.00 


Teacher 


16,000.00 


Inspector of Buildings 


1,059.96 


Fireman 


32,394.22 


Teacher 


157.50 


Substitute 


37,933.91 


Teacher 


2,054.25 


Highway - Summer 


531.24 


Policeman 


25,263.00 


Teacher 


93.20 


Fireman 


9.32 


EMT 


200.00 


Chaperone 


500.00 


Inspector of Animals 


91.09 


Water Commissioner 


40.00 


Substitute 


36,249.65 


Teacher 


30.00 


Election Worker 


550.00 


Substitute 


3,000.00 


Board of Health 


11,830.00 


Town Clerk 


20,085.00 


Treasurer 


100.00 


Clerk, Board of Registrars 


1,320.00 


Coach 


4,536.68 


Assessor 


10,497.74 


SPED Aide 


49,451.00 


Principal 


180.00 


Substitute 


17,390.00 


Teacher 


41,346.55 


Teacher 


1,216.26 


Police Officer 


62.91 


Private Duty 


180.00 


Chaperone 


5,535.34 


School Lunch 


40.00 


Substitute 


270.00 


Substitute 


4,000.00 


Electrical Inspector 


500.00 


Asst. Building Inspector 


301.32 


Landfill Substitute 


87.48 


Landfill Substitute 



36 



Szynal, James Jr. 
Tarr, Betsy 
Tefft, Robert 
Tessier, Cynthia 
Tetrault, Harriet 
Traks, Mary 
Tudryn, Pamela M. 
Vaughan, Valerie 
Vey, John P. 

Vollinger, Donald E. 
Vollinger, Linda 
Warchol, John A. 
Warner, Daniel A. 

Webb, Sherry A. 
Weeks, Gregory 



Wendlowski, Joseph J. 
Westcott, Peggy A. 
Wickles, Patrick 
Widelo, Christopher 
Wilkes, Aaron 
Williams, Darryl 
Williams, Jordan A. 
Williams, Suzanne 
Wolejko, Alan E. 
Wolejko, Diane 
Woodward, Gordon A. Jr. 
Worsnop, Paul R. 
Wright, Susan M. 
Wroblewski, Edward W. 
Yagodzinski, Christine 
Yanginski, Kurt E. 
Yarrows, Leonard A. 
Zabka, Nancy 
Zembiski, Joseph 
Zerneri, Justin K. 
Zerneri, Karen Z. 
Zerneri, Matthew 
Zgrodnik, George G., Jr. 
Zgrodnik, Josephine 
Zokowski, Marjorie S. 
Zygmont, Glenn A. 

Total Payroll 



10,417.57 


Vehicle Maint. Manager 


921.50 


Meals Driver 


200.01 


Animal Control Officer 


37,910.00 


Teacher 


2,665.00 


Substitute 


72.00 


Substitute Secretary 


13,089.60 


School Secretary 


13,000.00 


Librarian 


3,504.32 


Police 


890.00 


Private Duty 


31,755.34 


Water Department 


9,743.48 


Pre-School Aide 


37,949.00 


Teacher 


4,835.34 


Police 


2,241.08 


Private Duty 


35,237.06 


Teacher 


29,070.72 


Police/DARE 


167.76 


Private Duty 


93.20 


EMT 


27,314.69 


Highway 


29,035.16 


Teacher 


220.00 


Water - Sewer - Summer 


80.00 


Substitute 


40.00 


Recreation 


205.04 


EMT 


2,253.75 


Summer Custodian 


9,717.18 


Aide 


38,149.00 


Teacher 


38,263.00 


Teacher 


80.00 


Moderator 


9.32 


Fireman 


37,670.00 


Teacher 


22,458.58 


Water Superintendent 


39,222.00 


Teacher 


577.84 


Fireman 


57,943.00 


Interim Superintendent 


38,042.76 


Teacher 


1,041.75 


COA Driver 


482.00 


Recreation 


337.50 


Substitute 


10.00 


Recreation 


2,175.00 


Selectman 


5,671.50 


Library Substitute 


147.50 


Election Worker 


405.00 


Substitute 


$2,751,835.25 




Respectfully submitted, 


G. Louise Slysz 


Treasurer 



37 



SEWER COMMISSION 



To the Residents of Hatfield, 

The Wastewater Treatment Plant and 4 pump stations are 
now 10 years old. Although maintenance of these facilities has 
increased, they continue to run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 
with no major problems. 

In April we were notified that Chicopee Land Fill would 
no longer accept our sludge. With assistance from The Board of 
Health, we requested that the Northampton Landfill become 
available as a disposal site for sludge generated at the Hatfield 
Wastewater Treatment Facility. The Northampton Board of 
Health approved this request and are accepting sludge from 
Hatfield. 

The Sewer Commission applied for a grant with Western 
Massachusetts Electric to install variable frequency drives at the 
Maple Street pump station. This project qualified for a grant of 
$11,500, as it will save about 117,500 kwh annually. This work 
will be done in the spring of 1998. 

We would like to thank the voters of Hatfield for approv- 
ing the Bridge Street - Gore Avenue loop sewer project at the 



April 24th Special Town Meeting. Construction will begin in 
early 1998. 

The sewer tie-in fee was waived on King Street and North 
Hatfield Road from May - November as an incentive to hook-up 
to the sewer. Thirty-three households took advantage of this 
policy and hooked up to the sewer. Eleven households chose not 
to participate. 

In calendar year 1997 the Wastewater Treatment Plant pro- 
cessed 64,21400 gallons of sewage with and additional 192,350 
gallons being delivered to the plant from septic tanks in areas of 
town where no collection system exist. A total of 180 tons of 
sludge was generated in the process. 

The Sewer Commission wishes to thank the Highway De- 
partment & Board of Health for their assistance and cooperation 
when it was needed during the year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

William Korza, Chairman 
Frederick Dzialo 
Anthony Gillespie 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

During calendar year 1997, the Zoning Board of Appeals 
met for nine regularly scheduled meetings and three special 
meetings. The Board also heard the following appeals: 

• Stanley H. Jakobowski, Administrator of the 
Estate of Helen M. Otis, for a variance from 
frontage requirements to permit the construction 
of a single family home on a 20.57 1 acre parcel 
having no (0') on a public way. The appeal was 
subsequently withdrawn without prejudice. 

• To allow construction of an extension to an 
existing storage shed closer to a lot line than is 
permitted by Gregory E. & Maureen S. Weeks, at 
19 Plantation Road. The variance was approved. 

• Martha Armstrong and Alan Armstrong of 1 26 
Elm Street from the failure or refusal of the 
Building Inspector to respond or to issue a cease 



and desist order against Duseau Waste Industries, 
Inc. at 129 Elm Street. The hearing was closed on 
December 3, 1997 and the matter was carried to 
the Board's next regularly scheduled meeting on 
January 7, 1998. 

Several informal inquiries were made by property own- 
ers. The parties were referred to the Building Inspector or the 
Planning Board for appropriate action. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals holds regular meetings on 
the first Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. at Memorial 
Town Hall, except during July and August. The Board held pub- 
lic hearings for appeals as required. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thaddeus L. Kabat, Chairman 
Giles F. Desmond, Member 
Bryan Nicholas, Clerk 
Larry Stoddard, Alternate 
Kenneth R. Balise, Alternate 



38 



INSPECTION SERVICES 



To The Residents of Hatfield: 



The Inspections Department is pleased to submit their an- 
nual report for 1997. 

Building Inspector's Office Hours are Monday and Thurs- 
day 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. in Memorial Town Hall my phone 
number is 247-0491. 

Building permits were issued for the following in 1997: 



Single Family Dwellings 

Multi Family Dwellings 

Commercial Buildings 

Residential Renovations 

Non-Residential Renovations 

Communications Tower 

Municipal Buildings Renovations 

Roofs 

Signs 

Wood Stoves/Chimney's 

Garages 

Sheds 

Demolitions 

Barns 

Decks, porches 

Handicap Ramps 

Pools 

Annual Inspection 

Miscellaneous 



3 
2 
1 

79 

15 
1 
3 

39 
3 
7 
2 

14 
3 
2 

12 
5 
5 
1 

12 



209 



A permit is required for any, and all work on Electrical, 
Plumbing and Gas and must be inspected by our local inspector. 
Permit applications may be obtained at Memorial Town Hall. 

Mr. Stanley Symanski Jr., Electrical Inspector, reports the 
following: 



Applications for permit to do electrical work for 1997 



60 



Mr. Walter Geryk, Plumbing and Gas Inspector, reports 
the following: 

Applications for permit to do Plumbing work for 1997 35 

Applications for permit to do Gas work for 1997 24 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Stanley Sadowski 
Building Commissioner/ 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 



Total estimated value of Building Permits $3,380,726.00 



39 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



The objective of this report is to give you some insight as 
to what your tax dollars are doing for the town in regards to the 
yearly maintenance done to the some 57 miles of paved and dirt 
roads. I would like to give you a short summary as to some of 
the activities that went on in this fiscal year. 

The winter of 96 and 97 was not as bad as previous ones 
but it had its share of bad storms. The first and last storms seem 
to stick out in my The main reason being there was quite a bit of 
damage done in the way of downed power lines and trees be- 
cause of the heavy wet snow. Some roads were closed for a couple 
of days until the debris was cleaned up. Who needs snow in 
April? The crew stayed with the storms as best we could to keep 
the roads safe for residents and emergency vehicles. 

Saying good bye to winter means saying hello to the spring 
clean up. This started with first going around and cleaning up 
the excess branches that would hinder our sweeping process once 
this was completed the spring sweeping began. Your crew un- 
like other surrounding towns gives an extra effort when clean- 
ing the winter sand from our streets. Not only do we sweep from 
curb line to curb we also go approx. 6' on every resident's lawns 
to ensure us of getting all the sand. Although this is very time 
consuming I think in the long run it's a good idea for if we don't 
sweep it up it will later hinder the functions of the drainage sys- 
tem and basins. I think most residents will agree the town looks 
very clean once the sweeping is completed. 

Once the sweeping is completed projects that have come 
to our attention are started. Several drainage basins were in need 
of repair because of the OLD AGE SYNDROME; basins after 
years of cars and trucks pounding over them eventually deterio- 
rate making in some cases a sinkhole. Several situations like 
this were repaired through out the town. Linseed Road, Pantry 
Road for example. 



The summer brought a few of its own surprises; once again 
Mother Nature was not so kind to us. Two major windstorms 
came through knocking down trees in several sections of town. 
This kept the crew busy cleaning up trees and branches for a 
couple of weeks. Besides tending to the unexpected tasks the 
crew did some planned projects as well. Ditches were cleaned 
out in a few different locations such as Cronin Hill Road, Old 
Farms. This summer the crew paid special attention to the over 
grown brush on the farm roads, several weeks were spent cut- 
ting back small trees and briars in order to allow the farm ve- 
hicles to pass freely. While doing these planned projects the crew 
was still tending to normal business such as the mowing of all 
the road sides, the athletic fields and all the town owned prop- 
erty such as the Town Hall and the Public Library. These are a 
few of the expected and unexpected tasks that kept your crew 
busy this summer. 

Hopefully most of you town residents noticed the improve- 
ments done to Main Street and Elm Street. These are projects of 
a larger scale. Projects like this State Aid money we call Chapter 
90 Money was used. To describe what was done there, we milled 
off approx. 1.5" of the old worn out blacktop and put back approx. 
2", this type of maintenance will extend the life of the road. The 
material that was milled off will be later used when mixed with 
another material. 

Lastly we would like to say good luck to Donald Vollinger 
who went to the Towns Water dept. and welcome to Jim Szynal 
the new Vehicle Maintenance Director. Also the invitation still 
stands to anyone who has a complaint or complement to come 
up to the Town Garage and express it. 

Sincerely 

Chris Miller 

Highway Superintendent 



40 



WATER COMMISSIONER 



This was the year that the water dept was waiting for. This 
Spring the water dept put on line the new water filtration facil- 
ity. In following the safe water drinking act the town was man- 
dated to filter our service water supply so consequently we built 
a 1MGD capacity filter plant to filter the running gutter brook 
reservoir. This plant not only can filter 1 million gallons a day 
but also has 500,000-gallon clearwell bumping the town's stor- 
age from 500,000 to a 1,000,000 gallons; this gives the town a 
little more fire protection. Also with the new facility comes with 
two backup generators which enables us to get water to the resi- 
dents if in event of a power outage. For the most part the plant is 
running fine but like in the construction of something new there 
is always lies a few problems and kinks, but all were resolved 
relatively easily. The water dept had an open house in the early 
summer and had a good turn out. The water dept staff and com- 
missioners were present to answer any questions. 

As the dept, tries to do every year we replaced a few of 
our 100 year old hydrants with the state of the art model either a 
Smith or a Kennedy. In addition to the hydrant work we also put 
in several services through out the town. 



Seeing that the plant went on line in the early spring the 
D.E.P. decided that this would be a good time to make a thor- 
ough inspection of both the plant and the system itself. At the 
end of the inspection the D.E.P. was very pleased with the op- 
eration of the plant as well as the system. 

The D.E.P. gave us a waiver on test for lead and copper till 
1999 this means a savings to the town and we won't be around 
with those little milk jugs for a couple of years. 

The water dept. would like to say good bye and thanks for 
the continued effort to Bill Korza who resigned from the com- 
mission. In his replacement Sandy Shields was elected in May 
to the board and has helped a great deal. Also the commission 
hired a full time secondary operator, welcome a board to Donald 
Vollinger. 

The dept would like to extend to the residents the invita- 
tion to express any concerns or problems they may have with 
water or any thing to do with the dept. 

Respectfully Submitted 

The Board of Water Commissioners 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Residents of Hatfield: 

During 1997, the Conservation Commission held 9 public 
meetings and hearings responding to 8 applications for activi- 
ties in or near wetlands. These applications dealt with sewer 
construction in Bridge St., the landfill closure, the construction 
and single and multi-family dwellings, and the placement of fill 
or structures in floodplains, and herbicide treatment of roadside 
vegetation and street drainage improvement. All applications 
were approved, but special conditions or modifications were re- 
quired that better protected the wetlands of Hatfield. The Com- 
mission also initiated enforcement proceedings on three proper- 
ties where actions were undertaken without proper approvals. 

The Commission additionally provided technical support 
to several other Town Boards including the Board of Selectmen 
regarding applications and litigation not directly before the Com- 
mission. 

This year witnessed the implementation of the final River's 
Protection Bill regulations and the DEP storm water guidelines, 
which expanded the jurisdiction and responsibilities of the Com- 
mission as well as the responsibilities for applicants. The 
Riverfront Zone extends 200 feet from the banks of all perma- 



nently flowing streams and brooks. All new or modified activi- 
ties within this zone require approval by the Conservation Com- 
mission. The Town residents and businesses are encouraged to 
contact the Commission if they have any questions regarding 
their existing or proposed actions in this newly designated re- 
source area. 

The wetland and floodplain resources in Hatfield are ex- 
tensive and generally of extremely high quality. These areas are 
critical to flood control, drinking water supply, surface water 
quality, and wildlife and aquatic habitat. The Commission wishes 
to thank the citizens of Hatfield for their support during the year 
and compliance with the regulations of the Wetlands Protection 
Act. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul G. Davis, Chair 

A. Cory Bardwell 

Christopher Brennan, Secretary 

Thaddeus Kabat 

Virginia Orson 

Stanley Sliwoski 

Gordon Williams 



41 



WESTERN VALLEY WATER PROTECTION COMMITTEE 



To the Residents of Hatfield: 

The Western Valley Water Protection Committee 
(WVWPC) is a tri-town committee, which includes Whately, 
Northampton, and Hatfield. The Committee was initiated under 
a compact in 1991 between the three communities and the Pio- 
neer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) and the Franklin 
County Commissioners. The purpose of this regional compact 
is to foster joint and cooperative action concerning growth and 
development within these water supply areas to protect water 
quality. The WVWPC meets as needed to review development 
projects within the regional aquifer protection district and to make 
recommendations to the Planning Board relative to the proposed 
activities. 

A grant program, funded through the Department of Envi- 
ronmental Protection and developed with PVPC to address wa- 
ter quality within the Mill River watershed, entered the phase of 
replacing several defective septic systems within Town during 



1997. These septic system renovations will be completed during 

1998. Baseline water quality monitoring at several nearby sites 
was initiated this past year. Recommendations for Town poli- 
cies, regulations, and/or bylaws will be finalized during 1998 to 
address water quality concerns and to help ensure the protection 
of our Town's drinking water. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul G. Davis, Chair (Hatfield) 

Sally Klingenger, Vice Chair (Whately) 

A. Cory Bardwell, Hatfield 

Paula Jenkins, Whately 

Paulette Kuzdeba, Northampton 

Pioneer Valley Planning Commission 

Peter McNulty, Northampton 

Robert Osepowicz, Hatfield 

Chris Miller, Hatfield 

Franklin County Commissioners 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



The Board of Health has had another especially busy year 
enforcing State & Local health rules to the benefit of the Town 
citizens. 

The Board has been very busy with many-failed septic 
systems town wide. We have secured a Septic Management Pro- 
gram Grant to help residents correct their septic system prob- 
lems. This Septic Management Program Grant will help 
homeowners finance the cost of repairing or replacing their failed 
septic system at a low cost loan program through the betterment 
process. If you would like to find out if you qualify kindly con- 
tact the local Board of Health for further information. The Board 
has also worked with the Mill River Water Shed Advisory Com- 
mittee helping residents in the area of the Mill River to bring 
their septic systems up to Title V compliance. This Board has 
spent numerous, unlimited hours on West Street with many sep- 
tic system problems. The Board will be suggesting to the Sewer 
Commissioners to begin planning to extend the Towns sewer 
system to West Street. This area is a very sensitive area consid- 
ering most of it is in the Water Protection District, which could 
pose a significant threat to the water quality of Hatfield. 

We strive to keep the waters of Hatfield clean and healthy. 



The Board of Health has a hot line set up through E-Call 
for anyone who is interested in obtaining information regarding 
the Town of Hatfield's Recycling Center at the Transfer Station. 
Calling 1-800-800-6881 may access this information. 

The Board of Health meets the first and third Monday of 
each month at 9:30 a.m. in the Board of Health Office, Memo- 
rial Town Hall. Please feel free to stop by should you need our 
assistance. Should you have any comments, complaints or com- 
pliments please feel free to call our office at 247-0497. 

The Board of Health issues permits and performs inspec- 
tions for the following: 

Commercial Haulers, Septic Haulers, Perc Test, Septic 
System Installations and Repairs, Well Installers, Common Vict- 
ualler (food licenses), Motel License. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
William E. Pashek, Clerk 
Stanley Sliwoski, Member 



The Board has also been very busy with the capping of the 
towns landfill, as many of you may have noticed. We are esti- 
mating the final completion to be done in June 1998. We do 
apologize for any inconvenience this construction may have 
:aused anyone, but things should run a lot smoother now. 



42 



HILLTOWN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COOPERATIVE 



The Hilltown Resource Management Cooperative is a 
unique regional municipal organization created operated and 
funded by it's eleven members Towns of Ashfield, Chesterfield, 
Cummington, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, 
Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington. The HRMC's 
main goal is to continue to develop a first quality integrated 
recycling and waste management program for the region. 
This year, for the fourth year in a row the HRMC will con- 
tinue to be level funded. This year the HRMC will continue to 
plan and organize the following programs for the region: 

1) Monitor area recycling and waste management 
programs to make sure we are all recycling as 
much as we can! 

2) Plan and operate the regional Hazardous Waste Col- 
lection Program in the months of September and 
October. 

3) Plan and operate the regional Paint Recycling Col- 
lection in the months of September and October. 

4) Coordinate the regional sales of compost bins 
throughout the year. 



6) Provide outreach and education workshops and 
programs to HRMC area schools on an as needed 
by request basis. 

7) Provide outreach and education workshops and pro- 
grams to all HRMC communities on as needed ba- 
sis. 

8) Work with local officials to improve day to day 
operations, signage, and general information 
available at your Towns transfer station. 

9) Work with local Boards and officials on new DEP 
grant programs as they arise, as well as advocate on 
behalf of the eleven member Towns to State Offi- 
cials on state wide solid waste and recycling poli- 
cies. 

10) Create new programs to serve the Town needs as 
they arise. 

Feel free to contact the HRMC anytime at (413) 268- 
3845 if you have any questions about these valuable pro- 
grams. 



5) Provide recycling set out bins to all area schools and 
to area residents on an as needed basis throughout 
the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Eric Weiss - Administrator HRMC 
January 1998 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS SERVICES 



Under the Administration of the Department of Veterans 
Services, the Veterans Agent for the Town of Hatfield provides 
emergency financial and medical assistance to needy veterans 
and their dependants. 

The Veterans Agent is also available to assist in matters of 
Federal VA compensation, benefits and all other services to vet- 
erans. 

In the past year we have had only one veteran on the rolls 
for ordinary benefits. We have been able to help several veter- 
ans and their dependant in other areas of service related matters. 



If all veterans in town would give a copy of their discharge 
or DD214 to the Veterans Agent to be kept on file, it would as- 
sist the agent to be of better service to dependants in the future. 

The Veterans Agent may be contacted at 247-5308 regard- 
ing any questions. 

Richard E. Burrington 

Veterans Agent 



43 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Residents of Hatfield; 

The Council on Aging continues to expand our services 
for the elder population through the difficult times we have en- 
countered the past year. We are very fortunate to have over 60 
volunteers to help with our programs and activities. Without these 
dedicated individuals many of our programs would not exist. 
With very limited funds we have been able to fulfill the needs of 
most elders in the community with continuous support from the 
volunteers and with grants we have applied for. We hope for this 
continued support in the future and the community support to 
help us serve the needs of those who need our assistance. We 
would like to thank all town departments and staff for the assis- 
tance and services they have provided us with this past year. A 
special thanks to our Town Maintenance Manager, Jim Szynal 
for keeping the COA van in great working order. This being our 
towns only public transportation for the elderly, it has been very 
important to do so, and he has been extremely helpful. Also, a 
special thanks to Police Chief David Hurley and Sgt. Tom Osley, 
for working with us and TRIAD to provide a safe environment 
for the elder community. The programs we have worked on to- 
gether are so important to the well being and safety of elders 
living alone and have proved to be very effective. And last, but 
not least, thank you to Frank Bonk, who has worked hard to 
keep our facilities clean. Though it hasn't been easy at times, he 
always makes sure everything is shining. 

Our Volunteer Program last year included 60 volunteers 
who provided over 4,026 hours of service to our many programs 
and activities. Their services are worth approximately 
$28,742.00. We are very fortunate to have these truly dedicated 
people to help out when we need them. Each year a Volunteer 
Recognition is held in their honor at the Senior Center and the 
public is invited to attend. We thank the students from Smith 
Academy's In Service Club who volunteered their time helping 
with our Food Surplus Distribution each month. 

The Council on Aging consists of 5 Board Members; our 
staff, Jane Betsold, COA Director; Barbara Goll, Dining Center 
Director; COA Van Drivers; Meals on Wheels Drivers; a Volun- 
teer Coordinator/Assistant; and our volunteers. The Council on 
Aging and Senior Center are located downstairs in the Town 
Hall and are open Monday through Friday. We may be reached 
at 247-9003, and if there is no answer, please leave a message 
on the machine. Our meetings are held monthly at the Senior 
Center and dates and times are posted outside the Town Clerk's 
office. We encourage all elders to attend these meeting and wel- 
come any suggestions, concerns or comments concerning the 
Council on Aging or Nutrition Programs. We attend local and 
regional meetings with other agencies to update our resources 
and expand on new programs available to us. 



Our newsletter is published quarterly and distributed with 
the TRIAD newsletter. These are mailed to each town resident 
over 60 years of age. Copies are available at the Senior Center 
and Town Hall for anyone else interested. We have available 
free flyers and pamphlets outside the Senior Center concerning 
different topics. There are also available inside the Center, a va- 
riety of books people have donated to us to loan out. Senior 
activities and sign up sheets are located inside the Senior Center 
on the bulletin board. 

We have applied for and received grants from Highland 
Valley Elder Services, to fund our Nutrition Program, our News- 
letter and Dues. Also, two grants from the Executive Office of 
Elder Affairs to supplement the Director's salary for programs 
and meetings, to provide a Volunteer Recognition, and to estab- 
lish new programs; the other an Incentive Grant to provide a 5 
hour per week Volunteer Coordinator/Assistant for the Council 
on Aging. We received funding from the Hatfield Book Club to 
purchase new table coverings for our Dining Center. Supplies 
were donated from Gemini Ceramic Studio in Hatfield which 
were used as door prizes for our Christmas Party. 

PROGRAMS: 

TRANSPORTATION: Our Transportation Program con- 
tinues to expand due to lack of public transportation for elders. 
Many elder residents are giving up their vehicles, in most cases 
a wise choice due to safety reasons and we find this to increase 
our service needs. We try to accommodate everyone's needs for 
transportation and will continue to do so as long as we have a 
vehicle and funding for this program. Our van drivers, Marion 
Lapienski, William Podmayer, Ethel Podmayer, and John Rankin 
provided 5,288 trips for weekly medical appointments, lunch 
pick up and return, grocery shopping, mall shopping, movies, 
banking, hair appointments and misc. trips for 1997. They have 
been very dedicated and patient and we thank them for this and 
the assistance they offer. The COA van is available to all persons 
residing in Hatfield, age 60 or older, with priority given to those 
without any transportation. Appointments can be made by call- 
ing the COA office. 

NUTRITION PROGRAM: Funded by Highland Valley 
Elder Services, our hot lunch program is available Monday 
through Friday (no Holidays), at 1 1 :45 A.M. at the Senior Cen- 
ter in Town Hall for all persons over 60 years of age. Reserva- 
tions should be made at least 24 hours in advance by calling the 
Dining Center Director, Barbara Goll at 247-0480, Monday 
through Friday from 10:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. Our Meals on 
Wheels Drivers, Betsy Tarr, Florence Mayo, and substitutes, 
Arthur Belden, Helen Sikorski, and Marion Lapienski have been 



44 



very dedicated to the program. Persons interested in Home De- 
livered meals should contact the Nutrition Director. Monthly 
menus are available at the Center. This has been a wonderful 
social activity for our participants, as well as nutritionally im- 
portant. Volunteers and Drivers have served and delivered over 
12,100 congregate and home delivered meals last year. 

OTHER PROGRAMS: We have coordinated and orga- 
nized many health clinics, speakers and programs consisting of 
the following: Monthly Blood Pressure Screenings, provided by 
volunteer nurses are held the 2nd Monday of each month; the 
annual Flu Clinic was available to all persons over 60, at risk 
residents, and public safety personnel. Cindy Sadowski again 
volunteered her services to administer the vaccine, which was 
provided by the Mass. Dept. of Public Health. The Fuel Assis- 
tance Program, sponsored by Franklin Community Action Corp; 
Free Tax Assistance Program, sponsored by the American Asso- 
ciation of Retired Persons; Monthly Food Surplus, sponsored 
by the Western Mass. Food Bank; The Neighbor to Neighbor 
Program, funded by Highland Valley Elder Services; Farmer's 
Market Program, sponsored by the Mass. Dept. of Agriculture; 
Misc. Health & Foot Screenings, sponsored by the Hampshire 
County VNA; SHINE Program; Medicare & Medicaid speak- 
ers; the Senior Pharmacy Program, sponsored by the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs; Medical & Nutrition Speakers; Assis- 
tance to elders for Tax, Water, and Sewer Abatements; the TRIAD 
Program, involving Senior Citizens, Police Department, and 
Council on Aging. A special thanks to the S.A.L.T Council mem- 
bers who have worked so hard to help the TRIAD Program be as 
successful as it is. Volunteers are always needed for our pro- 
grams and activities, and if anyone is interested you may con- 
tact the COA office. Over 2,192 elders participated in these pro- 
grams. Our thanks to those who donated to our Medical Equip- 
ment Fund an Loan Program. We have medical equipment avail- 
able to loan free of charge at the COA office. Items donated by 
local residents help those who may need a walker, cane, crutches, 
a wheelchair or misc. items. Anyone wishing to donate any us- 
able items please contact our office. 



Recreational Activities available were Weekly Bridge and 
Bingo Games, evening bingo parties, holiday parties, mall shop- 
ping, movie trips, and motorcoach trips. Various intergenerational 
programs were held in cooperation with the local schools. Ap- 
proximately 2,787 elders participated in these activities. 

The Council on Aging provides services to over 700 
Hatfield Residents age 60 and over. Our goal is to continue to 
provide these residents with the services, assistance and pro- 
grams available to us and them so long as we have the informa- 
tion, resources and support of the community. We will also con- 
tinue to provide as much outreach, information, referral and con- 
tact with residents unable to come to us for assistance, as well as 
the remainder of residents. With support and cooperation from 
local and regional agencies we will provide these services on 
health, nutrition, safety and education. With this we hope to keep 
our elders independent, safe, healthy, and to only enhance their 
quality of life while living in our community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary H. Brennan, Chairwoman 
William Podmayer, Vice Chairman 
Rev. Worth Noyes, Secretary 
Henry Betsold, Historian 
Laura Schilling, Member 
Jane Betsold, COA Director 
Barbara Goll, Dining Center Director 



45 



HATFIELD TRIAD PROGRAM 



To the Residents of Hatfield: 

The Hatfield TRIAD is a program which is aimed at citi- 
zens over sixty in our community. It addresses quality of life 
issues such as crime prevention and safety in the home. It strives 
to instill a feeling of security in a portion of the population that 
is very vulnerable. These goals are accomplished through the 
cooperation of the Council on Aging, Police Department and 
Senior Citizens themselves. The Senior Citizens form a S.A.L.T 
Council (Seniors and Lawmen Together) which works with the 
TRIAD Officer and Council on Aging Director to identify and 
solve problems in the elder community. 

The Hatfield TRIAD S.A.L.T. Council members include 
Mary Brennan, Co-Chair, Ann Burda, Ellie Gillespie, Tony 
Gillespie, Co-Chair, Hazel Gabriel, Alice Maiewski, June May, 
Dick Mooney, Gladie Newman, Iris Sawin and Helen Sikowski. 
The Council on Aging is represented by Director Jane Betsold. 
The Police Department liaison is Sgt. Thomas Osley. 

The S.A.L.T. Council attended several educational con- 
ferences. These workshops were designed to enlighten the par- 
ticipants as to the use of the various tools available. One confer- 
ence highlighted the use of media to enhance the work of TRIAD. 
All members attending returned with helpful information to as- 
sist the program. The New England TRIAD Conference was held 
in New Hampshire and was attended by S.A.L.T. Council mem- 
bers Ann Burda and Helen Sikorski. The two day conference 
consisted of workshops on elder exploitation and financial fraud, 
fear of crime, victim assistance, telemarketing fraud, 
intergenemtional activities and danger at the door. 

S.A.L.T. Council Co-Chair Tony Gillespie continues to 
represent Hatfield TRIAD on the Hampshire County TRIAD 
Steering Committee. He attends monthly meetings with repre- 
sentatives of other communities and agencies to share informa- 
tion concerning the elderly. S.A.L.T. Council member Ann Burda 
will receive training to become a volunteer for the Money Man- 
agement Program. Thi • program is designed to help elders in 
the community needing financial guidance. 

The Hatfield Police Department applied for and received 
a Community Policing Grant from the State of Massachusetts. 
The money from this grant enables the TRIAD Officer to ex- 
pand on the Home Visitation Program. It will also provide fund- 
ing to purchase Emergency Lights for distribution to each over 
60 household at no cost. This grant is much appreciated because 
little funding is available to TRIAD Programs from other sources. 



OTHER SERVICES AND PROGRAMS 
OFFERED BY TRIAD 

HOME VISITATION PROGRAM: Visits to elders who 
live alone or are homebound are done on a regularly scheduled 
basis. The visits are important to let seniors know that someone 
will be looking in on them. The people that are visited enjoy 
having someone different with which to talk about any prob- 
lems they might have. Being alone is a very difficult thing for 
anyone. 

HOME SECURITY CHECKS: The TRIAD officer will 
come to senior's homes and does a survey with recommenda- 
tions of ways to make the home a safer place. The survey goes a 
long way toward making the home a safer place and improves 
peace of mind that the occupants are themselves safe. 

VIDEOTAPING OF HOMES: The TRIAD Officer vid- 
eotapes homes and valuables within the home to be used in case 
of disasters for making insurance claims. The homeowner re- 
tains the tape in a safe place. 

EMERGENCY LIGHTS: Emergency lights are those 
that screw into outside lights. When an emergency occurs, the 
light is flicked on twice and it blinks on and off helping emer- 
gency personnel locate them. These lights will be distributed 
free of charge to every senior household in the late spring thanks 
to the Police Department's Community Policing Grant. 

FILES OF LIFE: Files of Life are available to any 
Hatfield resident over 60 free of charge. These Files magneti- 
cally attach to the refrigerator door and contain key medical in- 
formation in case of emergency. They have been valuable in the 
past and EMS personnel look for them immediately. They may 
be obtained by calling the Council on Aging office at 247-9003. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS BOOKLETS: These 
booklets were compiled by the Hatfield TRIAD to assist seniors 
in the event of a natural catastrophe. It instructs people where to 
go and who to call. This book is also available by calling the 
C.O.A. office. 

TRIAD NEWSLETTER: A newsletter with TRIAD in- 
formation and home security tips is distributed along with the 
C.O.A. newsletter several times a year. It contains many inter- 
esting facts about what TRIAD is doing. 



46 



TRIAD MEETINGS: S.A.L.T. Council meetings are held 
monthly downstairs in the Town Hall in the Senior Center Din- 
ing Room. They are usually held the third Tuesday of the month. 
The public is invited to attend and new people are always wel- 
come. Call the CO. A. Office for exact times. 

At this time I would again like to thank Chief David Hurley 
for his cooperation and his help. He has always been 100% be- 
hind the TRIAD Program. It is very much appreciated not only 
by myself but by the seniors involved in the program. I would 
also like to thank our S.A.L.T. Council. They have really be- 
come the heart of TRIAD. Without their work and input nothing 



could get accomplished. A big thank you to Council on Aging 
director Jane Betsold for all her hard work. She spends a large 
amount of time helping this program stay as wonderful as it is. I 
would also like to thank Sheriff Robert Garvey and District At- 
torney Elizabeth Scheibel and their staff for their unerring sup- 
port of TRIAD. I look forward to another year of working for 
the good of all Hatfield's senior citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sgt Thomas Osley 
TRIAD Officer 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



STAFF: 



OFFICERS: 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS: 



David M. Hurley, Chief 
Thomas J. Osley, Sgt. 
Gregory E. Weeks, Sgt. 

Matthew Barstow 
William F. Boyle 
Michael Holhut 
Jessica Kiendzior 
Raymond Redfern 
William Scott 
Michael Stiles 
John Vey 
Daniel Warner 

(Selectmen) 

J. Michael Cahill 
Lary Grossman 
George Zgrodnik 



The Following is the annual report for the period Jan. 1, 
1997 through Dec. 31, 1997. 

Calls received 1,247 

Calls referred to other Services 121 

Arrests effected/Warrants issued 51 

Hearing attended/requested 169 

Citations issued 540 

Warning issued 214 

Accidents reported/investigated 43 

Stolen property 49 

Damaged property 37 

Found property 36 

Protective custody/Missing persons 1 1 

Unattended deaths 5 

Internal investigations 2 



The dispatch center has reported that the 91 1 mis-dial/prank 
calls have decreased from the previous year. My thanks to all of 
you for educating your children, and for your assistance in this 
area. The non-emergency numbers for the various Town Depart- 
ments can be found in this book, please make note of them for 
you future use. Please remember DIAL 911— TO REPORT A 
CRIME— SAVE A LIFE— REPORT A FIRE. 

The following Grant monies were received by the Town 
this past Year: 

COPS FAST: This grant continued to pay 3/4 of Sgt. 
Osley's salary and benefits. Tom continues to devote many hours 
to the TRIAD Program. Please refer to his report contained within 
this book for details. 

Vest Grant: This grant continues pay for bullet resistant 
vests for newly hired Officers. This is without any supportive 
cost to our Town. 

Dare Grant: This Grant totalled $6,000.00 which was 
awarded by the State. The money received covers the salary cost 
of replacing Sgt. Weeks during the instruction/training aspects 
of the program. Please refer to his report contained within this 
book for details. 

Community Policing Grant: This Grant totalled $1 1,000.00 
and was awarded by the State. These funds are being used to 
support the TRIAD program (see Tom's report for details), and 
to replace the hand held radar unit. 



47 



Cops More Grant: Our Town, along with the State Police 
applied for a Grant to purchase a complete Computer System. 
This system has been received and is on line. My sincere thanks 
to Officer Matt Barstow for his efforts in setting up the system, 
and training all of us who will use it. 

Programs which are continuing: 

Video tapping: Elementary School aged children were 
again video taped, and the next segment will take place before 
the end of this School year. My thanks again to ALL of those 
who assisted in making this such a pleasant experience. The 
equipment being used was purchased with a Grant from the State. 

Unregistered/junk vehicles: This problem has been in ex- 
istence for many years. The Town has begun the process in de- 
veloping a non-criminal citation system. These citations will be 
issued to those who have chosen to ignore the warnings issued 
by various Officers trying to enforce the by-law. I do realize that 
in some instances residents have a legitimate reason for having 
vehicles on their property (ie. restoring, death in family, snow 
removal, farming equipment, etc.), but some of these vehicles 
certainly do not fall with these categories. Upon receiving these 
citations the Officers will actively pursue the enforcement of 
the by-law. I request that if any resident who has a complaint to 
contact the Department. This is so the Officer can respond back 
to you, if the Offender has a legitimate reason for the vehicle to 
be on his/her property. 



House Numbering: This problem has also been a major 
concern for many years. With the non-criminal citation system 
this can also be addressed. I encourage all of you to go outside 
your residence/business when it is dark, and see if you can see 
the number from the street. The time spent looking for addresses 
can be the differences between life and death of you or a loved 
one. I strongly suggest the use of reflect or ized numbers. A 
Town by-law exists concerning the placement of house num- 
bers, which also must be visible from the street. This Depart- 
ment will report to the Building Inspector, the enforcing Offi- 
cial, any violations of this by-law. I also, will encourage the other 
Emergency Services to do the same, when responding to calls 
for service. 

All Officers have continued to receive all Training man- 
dated by Law, along with Specialized sessions. Some of these 
include CPR, First Responder, Radar instruction, Domestic/ 
Child/Elder Abuse, Defensive Tactics, Firearm/Baton/OC train- 
ing. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to those of you, along 
with members of the Police Department for your concern/sup- 
port during my back injury/surgery this past year. During this 
difficult time your cards/calls/visits made it much easier to en- 
dure. I wish also to express my thanks to ALL the various Boards, 
Departments, but most of all to YOU the Residents of our Town 
for your continued support of this Department. 

Respectfully submitted 



David M. Hurley 
Chief of Police 



48 



DRUG ABUSE RESISTANCE EDUCATION 



To the Residents of Hatfield: 

This year was the eighth year of the D.A.R.E. Program in 
our schools. On May 10, we graduated 33 students from 
D.A.R.E. and now have over 300 students that have graduated 
from D.A.R.E. This year also saw my second class of D.A.R.E. 
students graduate from Smith Academy. 

Also in May we enjoyed our graduation party that was 
held at the American Legion. Once again the graduating D.A.R.E. 
students and their parents enjoyed a great sit down roast beef 
dinner served by some of my past D.A.R.E. students and pre- 
pared by the always generous people of Jim and Betsy Tarr. This 
was also our eighth year with the Hatfield D.A.R.E. Bowling 
League where all the participants were rewarded with trophies. 
The magic of William Childs was enjoyed by all and most of all 
the flying rabbit trip. For those who didn't know, rabbits can fly. 
The special guests of Coach John Robic and UMASS player 
Tyrone Weeks were enjoyed by all. Everyone who wanted an 
autograph got one. We can't thank the UMASS basketball pro- 
gram enough for their time and consideration that they afforded 
our children. 

Prior to the D.A.R.E. graduation we had enjoyed many 
field trips and other activities at the Youth Center. We enjoyed a 
few trips to Mt. Tom Water slide where everyone had a great 
time. We also traveled to the Miniature Gold Course in Hadley 
where everyone toned their golfing skills. Some of the kids are 
still trying to hit their first ball off the driving range. The stu- 
dents also enjoyed monthly trips to Interskate 91 where we all 
got some bumps and bruises. In June we enjoyed a trip to see the 
Pittsfield Mets play. Everyone there filled up with hot dogs and 
soda. Each child was given a Mets baseball where they hounded 
the players for autographs. I got the most autographs. In August 
we again enjoyed a beautiful day on the ocean looking for whales 
and did see them. They were so happy to see us that the whales 
began "breeching" out of the water. Or was it they were "breech- 
ing" out of the water when we decided to leave. Either way we 
all had fun. 



The next year will be just as much fun. I encourage you all 
to come out and support the Program as much as possible in 
order to maintain the level that we now operate at. BUY THOSE 
COW PLOPS. I would like to thank all those faithful who con- 
tributed their returnable cans and bottles to our dumpster. This 
dumpster is now located by the Teen Center for your conve- 
nience. 

This past year has been a very rewarding year and look 
forward to an even better 1998. I would like to thank all those 
who came out and supported us this year. I would like to thank 
the Chief of Police for allowing me to continue the D.A.R.E. 
Program and arranging my schedule so that I may continue the 
Program. I would also like to thank from the bottom of my heart 
all the parents, teachers, friends and students that supported me 
during my heart surgery. Your support only made my recovery 
better and faster. It is times like this that you find out who your 
friends really are and I have learned this. Thank you all. 

Finally, to all my D.A.R.E. students past and present. Be 
all that you can be. You don't need the military services for this. 
Don't let anyone hold you back on your dreams. I've told you 
that you can accomplish anything you want as long as you want 
it bad enough. Be good to others human and animals. You all are 
my will to go on during hard times. If you feel you have yet to 
accomplish anything you all have accomplished earning my re- 
spect and love. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gregory E. Weeks 
Hatfield D.A.R.E. Officer 



In August we held our annual Cow Plop Derby and fire- 
works. Once again the cows did their thing and dirtied the fields. 
This years fireworks were the best ever and we are already plan- 
ning for this years Cow Plop Derby and fireworks which will be 
held on July 25, 1998 at the Lions Club Pavilion. Hopefully, a 
six team one-pitch co-ed softball tournament will also be taking 
place. As always there will be food and soda available. Due to 
the decrease in grant money and contributions I urge you to pur- 
chase your Cow Plop Deed so that we can continue to offer all 
the various programs to our children. 



49 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To The Residents of Hatfield; 

The following is the Fire Department's annual report for 
the calendar year ending on December 31, 1997. 

The Fire Department responded to the following calls dur- 
ing the last calendar year. 



Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Alarm Sounding 

Carbon Monoxide Alarms 

Motor Vehicle Fires 

Electrical Fires 

Assist on Medical Calls 

Heating System Failure 

Brush Fire 

Power Lines Down 

Search & Rescue 

Structure/Chimney Fire 

LPG/LNG Odor Investigation 

Smoke/Odor Investigation 

Bomb Threat 

Assist Federal Aviation Adm. 

Tire Fire 

Appliance Malfunction 



19 

35 
6 

10 
3 
3 
2 

28 
6 
2 
3 
4 
7 
2 
1 
4 
2 



The Fire Department performed the following inspections 
during the calendar year: 



LPG Inspections 
Smoke Detector Inspections 
Oil Burner/Tank Inspections 
Underground Tank Removals 



11 
21 
13 
12 



The Fire Department purchased a set of Hurst Jaws of Life 
Rescue System with funds that were donated by businesses and 
individuals throughout the area. Additional funds to complete 
the purchase was voted at town meeting for this purchase. The 
Department conducted a Massachusetts Firefighting Academy 
course on the use of these tools with the majority of the Depart- 
ment participating. The representative of the manufacturer also 
conducted an in depth training session when the tools were de- 
livered. We will be continually training on the use of these tools. 

The Fire Department emergency equipment is rapidly be- 
ginning to show its age. Our town Vehicle Maintenance Man- 
ager, with my agreement, removed our tank truck from service 
recently. This vehicle is underpowered and has bad brakes. Our 
town mechanic also has severe problems trying to obtain parts 
because of its age. This means we no longer have a town owned 
water tank truck for use in an emergency. This may seem like a 
trivial problem because of the fact that we have a hydrant sys- 
tem in 80% of the town. Hatfield has a poor or non-existant 
delivery system in sections of the town, such as Old Stage Road, 



sections of Cronin Hill, sections of Straits Road, and lower De- 
pot Road areas. In the event of a serious structure fire water 
must be transported to the fire scene to augment the existing 
system. We are now missing a "vital" link in our fire suppres- 
sion system. We, as do all the fire departments in the area, also 
depend on the "mutual aid" system. The mutual aid system does 
take time to activate and respond, however. This time is vital in 
the quick suppression of a working structure fire. I have asked 
our equipment manager to try and do some stop-gap repairs on 
our oldest engine. The compartments have rotted to the point 
where you can open the compartment doors and see the pave- 
ment. These problems must be addressed and rectified for the 
safety of the fire fighters and for the protection of property. 

We have reached the point where the center station is ex- 
tremely cramped, space-wise. We have equipment parked so close 
to one another that it is only a matter of time before some piece 
of equipment is damaged. We have worked through the state 
surplus system to gain additional pieces for the town. Our tank 
truck, recently taken out of service, our brush truck, generators, 
and trailers have been obtained at no cost to the town. The mem- 
bers of the department, on their own time, have done necessary 
body work, made repairs, and painted this equipment. We have 
saved considerable monies for the town through this program 
while gaining valuable equipment. 

I wish to thank my officers and members of the Depart- 
ment for their continued support during the past year. We have 
made great strides during the last year. We are moving quickly 
to the beginning of a new milleneum and I feel the Department 
is moving forward and will be prepared for what the years will 
bring for challenges. These dedicated individuals have worked 
countless hours during the past year to further their skills for the 
benefit of the Town. 

I would like to thank all the members of the Hatfield Fire 
Department, the various boards and departments for their assis- 
tance during 1997. 1 would especially like to thank the town hall 
secretaries, Teresa and Ruth, for all the vital assistance that they 
have given me during the year. Most of all I want to thank the 
citizens of Hatfield for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted 

Robert J. Osepowicz 
Fire Chief 



50 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 



The Town of Hatfield Ambulance Service responded to a 
total of 224 emergency calls this past year. This again is an in- 
crease over the previous years. I would like to assure you that 
the situation with one of our local businesses has been resolved. 
The increase in activity has come from the population of the 
Town of Hatfield and the people traveling through it. We wel- 
come this activity, it has been a challenge to us and one that we 
have been able to handle. 

This past year Gregory Gagnon was appointed to the posi- 
tion of Assistant Manager. Greg has been a member of the ser- 
vice for some time. Greg is ALS certified as an Intermediate and 
brings experience to this position. Greg has also taken on the 
duties as the duties of training officer. 

I had submitted names of members of the service for 
awards that I felt were deserved. I have received back from the 
Office of Emergency Medical Services that these had been ex- 
cepted. 6 members will be receiving special recognition awards 
and 5 members will be receiving save awards. These awards 
will be given out during Emergency Medical Week later in the 
year. I think this shows the caliber of the staff in the service. 

I am pleased to report that the ambulance is running well 
and is living up to the expectations that we had for it. For us in 
the service it is wonderful to have a unit large enough to work in 
and do good patient care. The new building is working out well 
also. We have held several training classes and meetings there 
already. 



family grow up and move away during this time. I feel that I 
have been a good leader and have never asked anyone to do 
anything that I have not done myself already. I have touched a 
lot of lives during this time and I hope that all have been a posi- 
tive experience. I had been invited to speak about the ambu- 
lance service at a meeting of one of the town clubs. I was intro- 
duced at this meeting by a very good friend of mine. The intro- 
duction went, if anything ever happened to me one the people 
that I would like to see over me when I woke up was Teddy 
Celatka. I truly hope that I have lived up to this. 

To the dedicated members of the ambulance service both 
past and present I thank you all. We have been through the good 
times as well as the times that have tested our skills and abilities 
to the limits. We have all learned from these experiences. With 
out your dedication and effort this service would not be what it 
is today. This was not an easy decision by any means for me to 
make but I feel that it is time. I will stay on to assist that board of 
Selectmen, if requested, to fill the position of Manager and in 
the transition period. 

I would like to thank all the citizens of Hatfield for your 
support through out all these years. Also all the members of the 
emergency services for working together and assisting the other 
during the difficult times. I would also like to thank the mem- 
bers of the Board of Selectmen both past and present for having 
the faith in me. To everyone, thank you all. 

Members of the service 



I have had several more members take to semi automatic 
defibrillator classes and are now certified in the use of it. I am 
now looking into the possibility of up grading the current unit 
that we have which is 10 years old. I am looking into replacing 
this with a new unit and placing the older unit into the police 
cruiser. 

We still maintain our Intermediate level of service. We 
will also continue using the Critical Response Paramedic unit 
from Northampton as it is needed. It is our way of getting the 
hospital to the patient faster. Everyone is reminded to use the 
911 telephone number for any type of emergency. 

After many hours of thinking about this I have made the 
decision that I will retire from the Emergency Services for the 
Town of Hatfield effective December 31, 1998. I have been in 
the emergency field for the Town of Hatfield since 1966. 1 started 
out in the fire department than moved more towards the ambu- 
lance service when it was started back in 1982. 1 have also been 
a member of several emergency services committee through out 
that time. A lot of people have no idea how much time and effort 
that is given up to maintain the needed training and credentials 
to remain a volunteer in any of these services. I have seen my 



Celatka, Theodore Manager 

Gagnon, Gregory Assistant Manager 

Banas, Laurie 

Baker, Douglass 

Crepeau, James 

Gaughan, Steve 

Noyes, Worth 

Ober, Mark 

Pelis, Cessie 

Pomeroy, Susan 

Rogaleski, Barrett 

Suriano, Jeffery 

Weeks, Gregory 

Williams, Darryl 



51 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



TO THE RESIDENTS OF HATFIELD: 

What a full year this has been! Headlining all of our other 
achievements is the completion of Phase One of restoring the 
Billings Way Tobacco Shed, also known as the HATFIELD 
FARM MUSEUM & EDUCATIONAL CENTER. With a 
$30,000 grant from the Massachusetts Historical Commission, 
and the financial support of the town, the Hatfield Historical 
Society, and from individual donors, the roof has been replaced, 
the doors have been restored, (one had to be built), all new sid- 
ing on the south side was done and broken boards on the other 
three elevations were replaced. Some structural framing was re- 
placed or reinforced. Whiteway Construction Co. of Westfield 
was awarded the bid to do the work. 

While Mary Lou Cutter supervised this project from May 
through December, and did the clerical work involved, we espe- 
cially want to recognize two men who assisted her. Cory 
Bardwell, officer of the Hatfield Historical Society, and Robert 
J. Cutter, a Society member were most helpful in overseeing the 
work, offering suggestions on construction, and locating hard- 
ware. 



The HAMPSHIRE & FRANKLIN COUNTY HISTORI- 
CAL COMMISSIONERS met in Hatfield for their semi-annual 
meeting on April 26th. We met at the Hatfield First Congrega- 
tional Church with approximately 40 in attendance. All Histori- 
cal Commissioners attended. At the October meeting held in 
Williamsburg, George Ashley and Mrs. Cutter attended. The 
sharing of ideas at these meetings is vital to keeping Historical 
Commissioners informed. 

On April 19th Commissioners Thomas Prew and Mrs. 
Cutter, and Mrs. Rita Prew, an officer of the Hatfield Historical 
Society attended a meeting at the Old County Courthouse in 
Northampton, offered by the Historical Records Preservation 
Advisory Board Subcommittee of the Hampshire County Com- 
missioners for the purpose of learning how to preserve docu- 
ments. 

In July, Mrs. Cutter, with several members of the Histori- 
cal Society, including Louise Slysz, Town Clerk, attended a 
meeting in Easthampton sponsored by the Historic Records Ad- 
visory Board. We are all interested in preservation of our his- 
toric documents. 



We wish to thank Mrs. Geraldine Smith, principal of the 
elementary school, and the school department for their coopera- 
tion. A huge portion of thanks go to the Historical Society for 
their assistance, and to Mary Burgess, Assistant to the Select- 
men for her help, and to all of the people who believed this project 
could be accomplished including former resident, Ambassador 
Robert J. Ryan, who not only gave us encouragement, but also 
helped financially. We are especially grateful to Duseau Truck- 
ing for hauling away the trash from this project free of charge. 

Those of you who have items you want to donate to the 
Farm Museum are asked to hold them for awhile longer. A con- 
crete floor should be poured before we move in, because we are 
faced with the dilemma of what to do with these artifacts if we 
need to move them out again to cement the floor. 



To better interpret our twentieth century museum items, 
Mrs. Cutter and Mrs. Rita Prew, an officer of the Historical So- 
ciety, attended six seminars in the spring in Deerfield sponsored 
by the Bay State Historical League. 

Mr. Ashley and Mrs. Cutter wrote the historical aspect of 
an Environmental grant application at the request of Mrs. Bur- 
gess. Mrs. Cutter attended a meeting of the Selectmen as re- 
quested to update them on our historic district work. Upon re- 
quest we assisted Mrs. Burgess and the Selectmen in deciding 
appropriate places to lay wreaths on Memorial Day. 

We also designed an informational pamphlet about the 
Historic Museum which is located on the second floor of the 
Dickinson Memorial Hall. 



We got a little publicity out of this restoration project. On 
October 7th, Sy Becker of Channel 22 Television news inter- 
viewed Mrs. Cutter and aired a short segment about the Farm 
Museum. 

Research for the Elm Street Historic District continues. 
Commissioners toured the district with Pioneer Valley Planning 
Commission researcher, Bonnie Parsons while Cory Bardwell 
and Bob Cutter narrated stories which Bonnie added to her work. 
We wish to thank Jane Betsold, Director of the Council on Ag- 
ing for, not only loaning us the COA bus for the tour, but also 
driving us through the district. 



Because the Connecticut River borders Hatfield on two 
sides, we consulted environmentalist, Terry Blunt, and then wrote 
a letter in support of nominating the Connecticut River as an 
AMERICAN HERITAGE RIVER. The letter was sent to the 
Connecticut River Watershed Council, and then it was forwarded 
to the Council on Environmental Quality in Washington, D.C. 
We are waiting now to hear if this longest river in New England 
has been accepted as one often AMERICAN HERITAGE RIV- 
ERS in the United States. 



52 



Under the leadership of Commissioner Thomas Carroll, 
an Ad Hoc committee has been formed to look into making the 
Dickinson Memorial Hall become both a secure and a climati- 
cally sound environment for books and our valuable historic 
collection, and to make the building more user-friendly. They 
are investigating installing air conditioning throughout the build- 
ing and providing heat in the second floor museum. This com- 
mittee is comprised of two Historical Commissioners, Mr. Carroll 
and George Ashley, Library Trustees, members of the Friends of 
the Library, and the Hatfield Historical Society. 

Mrs. Karen Czerniak's fifth grade students presented the 
Commissioners with arrowheads which they found during their 
surface search at the Ted Kabat Farm. The students had designed 
a diorama and mural depicting the environment of the Capawonk 
Indians and presented these also. The items were at first dis- 
played at the Town Hall and are now located in the museum. We 
wish to thank these young people and Mrs. Czerniak for their 
meaningful interest in our town history. 



Preservation awards were presented this year to Denise & 
John Courtemanche, 19 Cronin Hill Road, and Susan & Edwin 
McGlew, 140 Chestnut Street. Congratulations! Anyone wish- 
ing to nominate a property to receive this award can find forms 
to do so at the Town Hall. The property must be 50 years old or 
older, and must be recently preserved in the original style. At 
this time vinyl siding will not be considered. 

This year, Smith College presented the very first SOPHIA 
SMITH AWARD to honor its founder. The recipient was RUTH 
BADEN GINSBURG, SUPREME COURT JUSTICE. 

Again we wish to thank Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Moriarty for 
the complimentary cleaning of the museum. 

Kathleen Grandonico resigned from the Historical Com- 
mission after serving with dedication for over ten years, many 
of those years as our secretary. We will shall miss her knowl- 
edge, lightheartedness, and keen insight. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mary Lou B. Cutter, Chairman 
George H. Ashley III, Acting Secretary 
Thomas E. Carroll 
Thomas L. Prew 



53 



HATFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To The Citizens of Hatfield: 

The Trustees have worked through much transition this 
past year, in terms of staff as well as services. During this time, 
we were fortunate to have both employees and volunteers step 
in to keep the Library operating smoothly as we searched for 
our Acting Director. 

We are also much indebted to librarian Ruth Urell, a resi- 
dent of Hatfield, who worked many weeks to process books so 
that we could maintain the same high level of service we have 
always offered to our patrons. 

This year saw the formation of the "Friends of the Hatfield 
Library," whose goal is to provide assistance and "enhance the 
cultural life of our community." 

Many thanks to patrons who have made individual dona- 
tions, as well as the Hatfield Historical Society, and the Hatfield 
Book Club, whose ongoing support is much appreciated. 



The Library circulated 19,048 items this fiscal year, an 
increase of over 1,600 items from FY96. We will continue to 
provide our patrons with books, periodicals, and video and au- 
dio tapes, as well as the weekly story hour for the young set. 

The primary goal of the Trustees for next year is to have a 
handicapped ramp so that more residents can avail themselves 
of our services. 

We invite those residents of Hatfield who have not visited 
the Library recently to come in and peruse the collection of over 
20,000 volumes. You will see that we offer a warm, comfortable 
setting for adults, and a colorful, inviting area for children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Board of Trustees 

Jane A. Scavotto, Chairperson 

Kathleen Winters 

Thomas Carroll 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



To The Residents of Hatfield: 

The Recreation Commission would first like to thank two 
long-term members who retired from our board during 1997. 
Karen Zerneri and Bob Shea both volunteered endless hours to 
benefit the youth of our town. Bob was president and Karen 
secretary for many years, exhibiting dedication, hard work and 
honesty always with the intent of helping our town youth as a 
priority. We will miss them and their hard work, which greatly 
benefited the town of Hatfield. 

The number of children participating in our year round 
programs continues to grow. This is a direct result of parental 
involvement. With the exception of our six-week summer recre- 
ation program, all fall, winter and spring activities are run by 
volunteers. 

During soccer season we offer a one night a week practice 
for Kindergartners. A separate league is formed for grades One 
through Three and grades Four through Six. These Leagues which 
are both made up of four teams play two nights a week behind 
Breor Elementary School. 



Both girls and boys from grade One through Six enjoy 
basketball participation. Saturday morning First and Second grad- 
ers each has an hour of instruction followed by girls and boys in 
grades Three through Six. The town also sponsors a girls and 
boys traveling team participating in the Suburban League. 

During the spring T-Ball is enjoyed by grades One and 
Two. Overhand pitch is offered to the Third graders and grades 
Four through Six participate in the Frontier Farm League and 
Frontier Little League. The girls formed their own Softball league 
made up of four teams. 

Overall the Recreation Commission would like to thank 
all the parents who volunteer so much time and energy to make 
our programs so rewarding to the youth of our town. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Mark Wickles (Chairman) 
Richard Strong 
Dana Weybrew 



54 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Nature and Extent of This Report 

The period of time covered by this report is from January 
1, 1997 to December 31, 1997. During this period, a change in 
the Superintendency took place. On June 1st, Dr. Thomas Cimino 
arrived to assist Mr. Leonard Yarrows, the interim Superinten- 
dent. On July 1, 1997, he assumed all of the duties of superin- 
tendent. 

School Committee 

Mr. Patrick Gaughan was elected Chairperson in April. 

Mrs. Janet Szych and Mrs. Janice Davis were elected as 
new members replacing Mrs. Maureen Ryan- Wise and Mrs. Mary 
Williams. The other members include: Mr. Patrick Gaughan, Mr. 
Mark Vachula and Mr. Stanley Pitchko. 

The regular posted monthly meetings are usually held on 
the second Tuesday of the month, but are subject to change. Sub- 
committee meetings are usually held monthly and are subject to 
an "as-needed" basis. The members of the community are urged 
to attend these meetings as the School Committee looks forward 
to receiving input and relies on all points of view in formulating 
their decisions. 

The goals and objectives of the School Committee have 
been, and continue to be, to oversee the school system and pro- 
vide the best possible education while staying within the re- 
sources available. 

The community is fortunate that such high quality people 
serve on the School Committee. It takes a great deal of time and 
dedication to handle the complex and difficult changes with 
which they must deal. The committee is to be congratulated for 
the fine job it did during this last year. 

Superintendent of Schools 

A superintendent must always realize that the educational 
needs of the students are first and foremost. A team effort by the 
entire staff is needed to accomplish this end. My goals for the 
Hatfield Schools for the 1997-1998 school year are: 

1 . Create a culture which is characterized by trust, co- 
operation, positive interaction, and objectivity. 

2. Establish a council or board of directors to identify, 
plan and Implement a K-12 staff development pro- 
gram. 



3. Upgrade computer equipment and implement sup- 
port services in accordance with the approved K-12 
technology plan. 

4. Upgrade K-12 science equipment, materials and 
curriculum. 

5. Develop job descriptions and evaluation systems for 
the Special Education Director, technology person- 
nel, and other positions not covered by collective 
bargaining contracts. 

6. Create a program budget format for FY '99. 

Staff Appointments/Changes 

A number of staff changes have taken place resulting in 
some re-alignment within the system. They are: 

1 . Ms. Jennifer Toth - Health Teacher 

2. Ms. Angie Phillips - Spanish Language Teacher 

3. Ms. Emily Case - Middle School - Science Teacher 

4. Ms. Andrea Michaels - Elementary School Reading 
Specialist 

5. Ms. Katie Flavin - School Committee/S.A. 
Principal's Secretary 

6. Mrs. Laurie Parker - Middle School - Math Teacher 

7. Mr. Gary Isenberg - 75% School Psychologist 

8. Mrs. Pauline Curry - Special Education Director 

9. Mr. Richard Muise - Technology Teacher 
Changes to the Physical Plants 

1 . Smith Academy Solar Panels - Five solar panels were 
repaired by Granger Heating and Cooling at a cost 
of $ 1 , 1 00. As of the date of this report the solar en- 
ergy system is fully functional. 

2. Network Wiring - Approximately 90% of the wir- 
ing needed for connection to the Internet, the local 
area network (LAN) and cable TV. has been com- 
pleted. The technology in the building should be fully 
functional by spring of 1998. 



55 



3. Breor Elementary School Energy Project - The heat- 
ing system for Breor was converted from oil to gas. 
The work was done by Berkshire Gas Company at a 
cost of $12,850. 

4. Network Wiring - The entire building has been wired 
for both a local area network (LAN), cable TV. and 
the Internet. As of the date of this report all of the 
technology in the building is fully functional. 

Education Function/Changes 

MIDDLE SCHOOL - The Middle School was introduced 
into our school system replacing the Junior High School. It is 
housed within the Smith Academy building, separated from other 
classes, and follows its own time schedule. A team of four teach- 
ers was created to serve these students and they meet daily to 
assess their educational needs. The Middle School Concept places 
increased emphasis on individual development of the young 
adolescent, for this is a critical time of cognitive, social, emo- 
tional and physical growth. It is also a time that is associated 
with turbulence, self-examination, curiosity, questioning and 
exploration. Consequently, the Middle School concept is con- 
tinually being evaluated for determining the most effective meth- 
ods of education at this level. Traditional scheduling programs 
have been modified to encompass block scheduling as the need 
arises. 

Long Block Scheduling - A modified long block schedule 
was implemented in September. Each subject will meet for 73 
minutes, once during a three day cycle, in addition to the other 
periods of 48 minutes. Reaction by both staff and students has 
been mixed. In January 1998, long block scheduling will be re- 
viewed and modified, if necessary. 

School of Choice - The issue of whether or not this school 
system will participate in the School of Choice program, as out- 
lined by the state, is one that has to be voted on annually by the 
School Committee. In order to provide the community with in- 
formation both for and against this involvement, the School 
Committee formed a task force to examine this question. From 
these findings, the School Committee voted not to participate in 
the School of Choice program. 

Negotiations - The process of negotiating a new contract 
between the Hatfield School Committee and the Hatfield Teach- 
ers' Association began in April and concluded in November. The 
traditional method of collective bargaining was not successful 
and was replaced by another method called collaborative bar- 
gaining. 



Technology Plan - The Hatfield technology plan was ac- 
cepted by the State Department of Education and the Town pro- 
vided $31,000 for the first year of the five year plan. 

The five year plan is to integrate technology into the cur- 
riculum, teaching/learning environment and support services. The 
second part of its mission is to encourage and support the use of 
technology throughout the community. 

It is anticipated that in the near future courses in Com- 
puter Graphics and TV. production will be added to the Smith 
Academy curriculum. Efforts are already underway to secure 
funding for a TV studio. This facility will need to be estab- 
lished if the TV Production course is to become a reality. 

The concept of technology will have to be expanded to 
encompass science lab equipment, expanded use of the satellite 
dish.television and language labs to mention just a few ideas. 

Building Needs Task Force - The School Committee es- 
tablished a task force in September to determine if the space 
available within Breor and Smith Academy is adequate to serve 
the system for the next ten years. The Task Force is expected to 
complete its work by March 1998. 

Closing Comments 

The size of the Hatfield School system is both an asset 
and liability. However, in my short tenure, I have determined 
that the positives far outweigh the negatives. 

The staff has unselfishly placed the students' needs at the 
top of their own priority lists. As a result, teachers have become 
friends, mentors and counselors in addition to conducting an aca- 
demic orchestra of ideas. 

Students respond to the personalize education by apply- 
ing themselves and showing the utmost respect for their peers 
and their teachers. 

In my professional opinion, Hatfield is a model, small 
school system. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Thomas M. Cimino, Ed.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



56 



INDEX 

Ambulance Service 51 

Appropriation Table 15 

Board of Assessors 19 

Board of Health 42 

Board of Registrars 21 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Conservation Commission 41 

Council on Aging 44 

Fire Department 50 

Hilltown Resource Management Cooperative 43 

Highway Department 40 

Historical Commission 52 

Inspection Services 39 

Library Trustees 54 

Memoriam 4 

Police Department 47 

Drug Abuse Resistance Education 49 

Recreation Commission 54 

School Committee and Superintendent of Schools 55 

Sewer Commission 38 

Tax Title Account 31 

Town Accountant Balance Sheet, Appropriation Table 1 1 

Town Clerk 22 

Town Collector 17 

Town Elections 24 

Town Employees' Names, Wages and Positions 32 

Town Meeting Activity 14 

Town Meeting Excerpts 23 

Town Officers 5 

Treasurer 25 

TRIAD Program 46 

Veterans Services 43 

Water Commissioner 41 

Water Supply Protection Committee 42 

Zoning Board of Appeals 38 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 

EMERGENCY ONLY 

FIRE 911 

POLICE 911 

AMBULANCE 911 

NON EMERGENCY 

FIRE 247-9008 

POLICE 247-0323 

AMBULANCE 247-0489 

AMBULANCE BILLING 247-9200 

STATE POLICE 584-3000 

DA.R.E. PROGRAM 247-DARE 

ABUSE & RAPE CRISIS HOT LINE 733-7100 

TOWN OFFICES 

MEMORIAL TOWN HALL, 59 MAIN STREET 247-9200 

247-9211 

FAX MACHINE 247-5029 

ACCOUNTANT 247-0495 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/SELECTMEN 247-0481 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 247-0322 

BUILDING COMMISSIONER 247-0491 

BOARD OF HEALTH 247-0497 

TOWN CLERK/TREASURER 247-0492 

TOWN COLLECTOR 247-0496 

COUNCIL ON AGING 247-9003 

COUNCIL ON AGING MEAL SITE 247-0480 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, 10 STRAITS ROAD 247-5646 

HOUSING AUTHORITY, CAPAWONK 247-9202 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, 35 MAIN STREET 247-9097 
(HOURS: TUES & THURS. 10 AM TO 3 PM; WED & FRI 6 PM TO 9 PM; 
SAT. 9 AM TO 1 PM) 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 33 MAIN STREET 247-5010 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 247-97 1 1 

SMITH ACADEMY, 34 SCHOOL STREET 247-564 1 

TRANSFER STATION, 6 STRAITS RO.-D) 247-55 15 
(HOURS: MON & WED. 1 TO 6 PM & SAT. 8 AM TO 5 PM) 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE MANAGER, 10 STRAITS ROAD 247-0498 

WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT, 260 MAIN STREET 247-9844 

WATER TREATMENT FACILITY, RESERVOIR ROAD 247-5222